See also: Flamboyant

English

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flamboyant costumes worn during the Carnival period in Brazil
flamboyant or royal poinciana, a tropical tree
Flamboyant Gothic tracery

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French flamboyant (flaming, wavy), participle of flamboyer (to flame), from Old French flamboier, from flambe (flame). The architectural style derives its name from the flame-like shapes in the tracery.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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flamboyant (comparative more flamboyant, superlative most flamboyant)

  1. Showy, bold or audacious in behaviour, appearance, etc.
    • 1902, G. K. Chesterton, “The Optimism of Byron”, in Twelve Types:
      When we see some of the monstrous and flamboyant blossoms that enrich the equatorial woods, we do not feel that they are conflagrations of nature; silent explosions of her frightful energy. We simply find it hard to believe that they are not wax flowers grown under a glass case.
    • 1920, Frederic Taber Cooper, The Craftsmanship of Writing, Chapter VI: The Question of Clearness,
      But a scorn of flamboyant neckties and checkerboard trousers is no excuse for going to the opposite extreme of a blue flannel shirt and overalls; [] .
    • 1962 May 12, Douglas MacArthur, Duty, honor, country:
      The unbelievers will say they are but words, but a slogan, but a flamboyant phrase.
    • 2023 June 12, Angela Giuffrida, Lorenzo Tondo, “Silvio Berlusconi, scandal-ridden former Italian prime minister, dies aged 86”, in The Guardian[1], →ISSN:
      Health of flamboyant media tycoon who led three Italian governments had deteriorated in recent years[.]
  2. (architecture) Referring to the final stage of French Gothic architecture from the 14th to the 16th centuries.
  3. Of a blade: forged in a wavy, undulating pattern, like a flame-bladed sword or a kris.
    Synonym: serpentine

Derived terms

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Translations

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Noun

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flamboyant (plural flamboyants)

  1. The royal poinciana (Delonix regia), a showy tropical tree from Madagascar.

Translations

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Further reading

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Danish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French flamboyant (flaming, wavy), present participle of flamboyer (to flame, blaze).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /flamborjant/, [flɑmb̥oɐ̯ˈjanˀd̥] or IPA(key): /flamboajant/, [flɑmb̥oɑˈjanˀd̥]

Adjective

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flamboyant

  1. flamboyant, magnificent, opulent

Inflection

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Inflection of flamboyant
Positive Comparative Superlative
Indefinte common singular flamboyant 2
Indefinite neuter singular flamboyant 2
Plural flamboyante 2
Definite attributive1 flamboyante
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Synonyms

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French

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Pronunciation

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Participle

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flamboyant

  1. present participle of flamboyer

Adjective

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flamboyant (feminine flamboyante, masculine plural flamboyants, feminine plural flamboyantes)

  1. flaming (also heraldry)
  2. flamboyant

Descendants

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  • Danish: flamboyant
  • English: flamboyant
  • German: flamboyant
  • Romanian: flamboiant

Noun

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French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

flamboyant m (plural flamboyants)

  1. flamboyant (Delonix regia)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Further reading

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German

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French flamboyant.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [flãbo̯aˈjant]
  • Hyphenation: flam‧bo‧yant
  • Audio:(file)

Adjective

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flamboyant (strong nominative masculine singular flamboyanter, comparative flamboyanter, superlative am flamboyantesten)

  1. flamboyant

Declension

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Further reading

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Portuguese

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from French flamboyant.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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flamboyant m (plural flamboyants)

  1. Alternative spelling of flamboaiã

Further reading

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