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See also: flög

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From unattested *floggian, a stem variant of Proto-Germanic *flukkōną (to beat),[1] itself a secondary zero-grade iterative with unetymological -u-, derived from *flōkaną. The original zero-grade iterative *flakkōną had been misinterpreted as an o-grade. See flack (to beat), also as a dialectal noun "a blow, slap".

VerbEdit

flog (third-person singular simple present flogs, present participle flogging, simple past and past participle flogged)

  1. (transitive) To whip or scourge someone or something as punishment.
  2. (transitive) To use something to extreme; to abuse.
    • 2002 October 30, Chris Wardrop, “VL idles rough when warm...”, in aus.cars, Usenet[1]:
      I did seven laps of Fyshwick with the mechanic today. I was turning lots of heads on the last few, people must of thought I was nuts, flogging the car then stopping, then driving slow then flogging it again.
  3. (transitive, Britain) To sell something.
    • 2001 January 26, Paul Edwards, “Optus $5/month 5110, T10 and 2288 only 4 days”, in aus.comms.mobile, Usenet[2]:
      And then there's my part time job at Telstra Bigpond flogging their cable network for just $67.55/month long term cost, a BARGAIN, and the other part time job flogging Foxtel at something like $50/month.
  4. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand) To steal something.
  5. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand) To defeat easily or convincingly.
    • 1999 August 16, Mr Ripper, “Nothing to Crow About”, in rec.sport.football.australian, Usenet[3]:
      The Swannies got on a real roll over rounds 16/17 & 18 of 1987. In consecutive SCG matches, they flogged the Eags 30.21 to 10.11, followed that with a 36.20 to 11.7 demolition of the Dons and finally a 31.12 to 15.17 thrashing of Richmond.
    • 2001 June 9, Cas., “Eng v Aus 1977”, in aus.sport.cricket, Usenet[4]:
      Anyone with cable watch this on ESPN "History of Cricket" last night? Australia got flogged by an innings in the fourth test.
    • 2004 June 5, Greg Vincent }:c{, “POLISER- Roosters v Bulldogs”, in aus.sport.rugby-league, Usenet[5]:
      It'll make the Raiders look good.  Getting flogged by a team that got flogged by a team that got flogged by the Bulldogs.
  6. (transitive, agriculture) To exploit.
    • 2007 February 6, “Suppliers the losers in Coles-Woolworths war”, in The Age:
      The environment is paying dearly as producers flog their land. Sustainable agriculture needs a new generation of energised science and technology-trained farmers
SynonymsEdit
  • (to whip or scourge): whip
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Blend of fake +‎ blog

NounEdit

flog (plural flogs)

  1. (Internet slang) A weblog designed to look authentic, but actually developed as part of a commercial marketing strategy to promote some product or service.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 144

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

flog

  1. past tense of fliegen

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flog n (genitive singular flogs, nominative plural flog)

  1. an epileptic fit

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

flog (plural flogs)

  1. flake

DeclensionEdit