arrogant

Contents

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arrogant, from Latin arrogāns, present active participle of arrogō.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant ‎(comparative more arrogant, superlative most arrogant)

  1. Having excessive pride in oneself, often with contempt or disrespect for others.
    • 1878, Friedrich Nietzsche, Wanting to be Loved:
      The demand to be loved is the greatest of all arrogant presumptions.
    • 1987, Sam Donaldson, Hold On, Mr President!:
      Call me a braggart, call me arrogant. People at ABC (and elsewhere) have called me worse. But when you need the job done on deadline, you’ll call me.

Usage notesEdit

  • Said of people, statements, etc.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural arrogants)

  1. arrogant

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant ‎(neuter arrogant, definite and plural arrogante)

  1. arrogant

DutchEdit

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant m ‎(feminine singular arrogante, masculine plural arrogants, feminine plural arrogantes)

  1. arrogant

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant ‎(not comparable)

  1. arrogant

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant

  1. arrogant

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arrogant

  1. arrogant

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of arrogant
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular arrogant mer arrogant mest arrogant
Neuter singular arrogant mer arrogant mest arrogant
Plural arroganta mer arroganta mest arroganta
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 arrogante mer arrogante mest arrogante
All arroganta mer arroganta mest arroganta
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.
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