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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

fum (third-person singular simple present fums, present participle fumming, simple past and past participle fummed)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To play upon a fiddle.
    • Ben Jonson
      Follow me, and fum as you go.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fum (plural fums)

  1. (mythology, obsolete) A mythological Chinese bird, the fènghuáng.
    • 1823, Richard Sickelmore, The history of Brighton from the earliest period to the present time:
      The fum is a bird said to be found in no part of the world but China. It is described as of most admirable beauty, and if at any time absent, or long unseen, it is regarded as an omen of some misfortune to the royal family.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for fum in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūmus. Compare Romanian fum.

NounEdit

fum n (plural fumuri)

  1. smoke

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin fūmus, from Proto-Italic *fūmos, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fum m (uncountable)

  1. smoke

Related termsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fames.

NounEdit

fum m

  1. hunger

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūmus.

NounEdit

fum m (plural fums)

  1. smoke

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūmus. Replaced in later French by fumée.

NounEdit

fum m (oblique plural funs, nominative singular funs, nominative plural fum)

  1. smoke

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūmus, from Proto-Italic *fūmos, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós.

NounEdit

fum n (plural fumuri)

  1. smoke

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fumus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fum m (plural fumi)

  1. smoke

See alsoEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French fourmi.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fum

  1. (obsolete) ant (insect)

Usage notesEdit

This older term has been replaced by furmid "ant".

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit