See also: fumé and fumê

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French fum (smoke, steam, vapour), from Latin fūmus (vapour, smoke), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (to smoke, raise dust). More at dun, dusk, dust.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fjuːm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

NounEdit

fume (plural fumes)

  1. A gas or vapour/vapor that is strong-smelling or dangerous to inhale.
    Don't stand around in there breathing the fumes while the adhesive cures.
    • (Can we date this quote by T. Warton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the fumes of new shorn hay
  2. A material that has been vaporized from the solid or liquid state to the gas state and re-coalesced to the solid state.
    Lead fume is a greyish powder, mainly comprising lead sulfate.
  3. Rage or excitement which deprives the mind of self-control.
    the fumes of passion
    (Can we find and add a quotation of South to this entry?)
  4. Anything unsubstantial or airy; idle conceit; vain imagination.
    • (Can we date this quote by Francis Bacon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      a show of fumes and fancies
  5. The incense of praise; inordinate flattery.
    • (Can we date this quote by Burton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      to smother him with fumes and eulogies
  6. (obsolete) A passionate person.

Usage notesEdit

  • In the sense of strong-smelling or dangerous vapor, the noun is typically plural, as in the example.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fume (third-person singular simple present fumes, present participle fuming, simple past and past participle fumed)

  1. (transitive) To expose (something) to fumes; specifically, to expose wood, etc., to ammonia in order to produce dark tints.
  2. (transitive) To apply or offer incense to.
    • 1740, John Dyer, “The Ruins of Rome. A Poem.”, in Poems. [...] Viz. I. Grongar Hill. II. The Ruins of Rome. III. The Fleece, in Four Books, London: Printed by John Hughs, for Messrs. R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, [], published 1759, OCLC 991281870, pages 42–43:
      Tyrian garbs, / Neptunian Albion's high teſtaceous food [i.e., oysters], / And flavour'd Chian wines with incenſe fum'd / To ſlake Patrician thirſt: for theſe, their rights / In the vile ſtreets they proſtitute to ſale; / Their ancient rights, their dignities, their laws, / Their native glorious freedom.
  3. (intransitive) To emit fumes.
    • (Can we date this quote by Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      where the golden altar fumed
    • (Can we date this quote by Roscommon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Silenus lay, / Whose constant cups lay fuming to his brain.
  4. (intransitive) To pass off in fumes or vapours.
    • (Can we date this quote by Cheyne and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Their parts are kept from fuming away by their fixity.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) To express or feel great anger.
    He’s still fuming about the argument they had yesterday.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He frets, he fumes, he stares, he stamps the ground.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Walter Scott and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Her mother did fret, and her father did fume.
  6. (intransitive, figuratively) To be as in a mist; to be dulled and stupefied.

TranslationsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fumer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fumer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fumer

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since circa 1300. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese fumo (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin fūmus. Cognate with Portuguese fumo and Spanish humo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fume m (plural fumes)

  1. smoke
    • c1300, R. Martínez López (ed.), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 209:
      coyda que o bafo et fume daquel fogo que ensuzou et [empoçoou] as agoas et aterra daly
      he thinks that the fumes and the smoke of that fire defiled and poisoned the waters and the soil there
    • 1348, J. Méndez Pérez & al. (eds.), El monasterio de San Salvador de Chantada, Santiago de Compostela: I. Padre Sarmiento, page 326:
      a vida deste mundo he asy como a sonbra, et quando ome se deleyta en ella he asy como o fumo que se vay logo
      the life in this world is like the shadow, and when a man delight in it is like the 'smoke, which soon goes away
  2. fume
    Synonyms: bafo, vapor
  3. (figuratively, in the plural) haughtiness

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

ReferencesEdit

  • fume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • fume” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • fume” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • fume” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fume” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

LatinEdit

NounEdit

fūme

  1. vocative singular of fūmus

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Old French fum, from Latin fũmus, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fume (plural fumes)

  1. Visible gaseous emanations; fumes or smoke.
  2. Any sort of vapour or gaseous emanation.
  3. (physiology) Fumes as the supposed cause of feelings.
  4. (rare) An airborne scent or odour.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: fume
  • Scots: fume
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French fumer.

VerbEdit

fume

  1. Alternative form of fumen

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of fumar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of fumar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of fumar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fumar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fumar.

TarantinoEdit

NounEdit

fume

  1. smoke