See also: GIB, GiB, and Gib.

English edit

 
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Etymology 1 edit

Unknown (14th century). Perhaps abbreviated from Gilbert, the name of the cat in the medieval fables of Reynard the Fox, Romaunt of the Rose, and so on.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪb/
    • (file)
  • UK sometimes also IPA(key): /d͡ʒɪb/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪb

Noun edit

gib (plural gibs)

  1. A castrated male cat or ferret.
  2. A male cat; a tomcat.
  3. A hooked prolongation on the lower jaw of a male salmon or trout.
  4. The lower lip of a horse.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Unknown (late 18th century).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gib (plural gibs)

  1. A strip, wedge, or bolt made from metal or wood and used for holding a machine part in place; usually with features (such as a taper and/or set screws) that allow for fine adjustment of the part's position.
Translations edit

Verb edit

gib (third-person singular simple present gibs, present participle gibbing, simple past and past participle gibbed)

  1. To fasten in place with a gib.

Etymology 3 edit

Shortened from giblet.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gib (plural gibs)

  1. (video games) Miscellaneous pieces of a fragged character, most often in first-person shooters.

Verb edit

gib (third-person singular simple present gibs, present participle gibbing, simple past and past participle gibbed)

  1. (transitive, video games) To blast an enemy or opponent into gibs.

Etymology 4 edit

From the trademark GIB, registered by Fletcher Building Holdings Limited, the major brand of plasterboard in New Zealand.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gib (uncountable)

  1. (New Zealand) plasterboard.

Verb edit

gib (third-person singular simple present gibs, present participle gibbing, simple past and past participle gibbed)

  1. (New Zealand) To install plasterboard.
    • 2014 October 4, Chris Hutching, “An earthquake repair story from the south”, in NBR:
      As the wallpaper stripping progresses the damage to walls becomes more apparent. It may require more variation orders for gibbing of walls as well as ceilings.

Etymology 5 edit

Verb edit

gib

  1. Pronunciation spelling of give.
    • 1880, Albion W. Tourgee, “Red Wing”, in Bricks Without Straw, New York, N.Y.: Fords, Howard, & Hulbert; London: Sampson Low & Co.; Montreal, Que.: Dawson Bros., page 87:
      Only gib me some few shingles an’ a flo’, an’ dar yer hev jes ez good a church ez de ’postles ebber hed ter preach in.
    • 1896, Opie Read, chapter VIII, in The Jucklins, Chicago, Ill.: Laird & Lee, pages 105 and 107:
      I has gib you licker an’ I has gib you music, an’ wife, dar, is cookin’ supper fur you, an’ it ain’ no mo’ den reason dat I’d wanter know whut we gwine git fur it. [] “Yo’ supper is done an’ ef you’ll jest gib me room I’ll fix de table,” the woman remarked, taking the bread off the griddle.
    • 1902, John Kendrick Bangs, Bikey the Skicycle & Other Tales of Jimmieboy, New York, N.Y.: Riggs Publishing Company, page 181:
      De kindest heartedest little boy in de worl’ would forget to gib his cat its dinner if he had a new toy to play wid, or a new suit o’ party dress to put on to show his poppy when he come home.
    • 1938, Hervey Allen, Action at Aquila, New York, N.Y.: Farrar & Rinehart, page 98:
      Please, Mars’ Gineral, do gib me dime fer snack.
    • 1988, Lynda Barry, The Good Times Are Killing Me, published 2020, →ISBN:
      Don’t your mommy gib you bacoln?
    • 2002 July, Patricia Sprinkle, Who Invited the Dead Man?, Signet, →ISBN:
      “My daddy doesn’t gib me guns, ’cause he doesn’t like dem. But Pop will gib me one when I gets ten.”
    • 2007, Victoria Pade, A Family for the Holidays, Silhouette Books, →ISBN, page 12:
      “Maybe you could jus’ gib me one, then,” she suggested sweetly.
    • 2021 March, Srashti Behure, Unconditional: Pets Over Peeps, Spectrum of Thoughts (an affiliate of FanatiXx), →ISBN:
      Hooman you is nice, / You gib me bath so I no hab lice.
    • 2022 February 8, Sohini Sengupta, “Dogs react to human freezing their favourite toys. Watch hilarious video”, in Hindustan Times[1]:
      Gib us our toy bacc!” reads the caption accompanying this dog video [by @lifewithkleekai].
    • 2022 February 10, Steve Rouge, “The Cutest Puppies of the Day”, in Medium[2]:
      “I be model for fotos, now you gib treats”

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afar edit

Etymology edit

From Arabicجَيْب(jayb).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡib/, [ɡɪb]
  • Hyphenation: gib

Noun edit

gib m (plural giibitté f or gibwá f)

  1. pocket

References edit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

gib

  1. singular imperative of geben
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of geben

Lower Sorbian edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

gib

  1. second-person singular imperative of gibaś

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡip/
  • Rhymes: -ip
  • Syllabification: gib

Verb edit

gib

  1. second-person singular imperative of gibać

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gybъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

gȋb m (Cyrillic spelling ги̑б)

  1. movement (of body or a body part)
  2. fold
  3. joint

Declension edit

References edit

  • gib” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

gib

  1. Romanization of 𒄃 (gib)