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See also: táper

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English taper, from Old English tapor (taper, candle, wick of a lamp), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Latin papyrus (papyrus", used in Mediaeval times to mean "wick of a candle), or of Celtic origin related to Irish tapar (taper), Welsh tampr (a taper, torch). Compare Sanskrit तपती (tápati, (it) warms, gives out heat; to be hot; to heat). More at tepid.

NounEdit

taper (plural tapers)

  1. A slender wax candle; a small lighted wax candle
    • ~1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act I, scene I, line 157:
      strike on the tinder, ho!/ Give me a taper.
    • 1913, Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Change
      Love used to carry a bow, you know,
      But now he carries a taper;
      It is either a length of wax aglow,
      Or a twist of lighted paper.
  2. (by extension) a small light.
  3. A tapering form; gradual diminution of thickness and/or cross section in an elongated object
    the taper of a spire
    The legs of the table had a slight taper to them.
    • 2005, Michael Ellis, Apollo Rises (page 15)
      Her hair hangs over her ears and flows to a taper at the back of her neck where it is held in place with a wide and circular black clasp.
  4. A thin stick used for lighting candles, either a wax-coated wick or a slow-burning wooden rod.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

taper (third-person singular simple present tapers, present participle tapering, simple past and past participle tapered)

  1. (transitive) To make thinner or narrower at one end.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 3
      Though true cylinders without — within, the villanous green goggling glasses deceitfully tapered downwards to a cheating bottom.
  2. (intransitive) To diminish gradually.
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

tape +‎ -er

NounEdit

taper (plural tapers)

  1. (weaving) One who operates a tape machine.
  2. Someone who works with tape or tapes.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

taper

  1. present tense of tape

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French taper, from Old French tapper, taper (to tap), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *tappōn, *dabbōn (to strike) or from Middle Low German tappen, tapen (to tap, rap, strike); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dab- (to strike), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰebʰ- (to beat, strike, stun, be speechless). Related to German tappen (to grope, fumble), Dutch deppen (to dab), Icelandic tappa, tapsa, tæpta (to tap). Related to dab.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

taper

  1. (transitive) to slap, knock, beat
  2. (transitive) to type (use a keyboard or typewriter)
  3. (intransitive, followed by the preposition sur) to hit, beat, rap
  4. (intransitive) to beat down (of the sun); to go to one's head (of wine etc.)
  5. (intransitive, slang) to stink, pong, reek
  6. (reflexive, slang) to put away (a meal etc.)
    • Je me suis tapé un bon petit hamburger hier soir.
  7. (reflexive, vulgar, slang) to fuck (have sex)
    • Il s'est tapé la fille de son patron.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

taper (gerund tap'thie)

  1. (Jersey, onomatopoeia) to hit, knock

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

taper

  1. a loser

InflectionEdit


Related termsEdit

NounEdit

taper

  1. Indefinite plural of tape

VerbEdit

taper

  1. Present tense of tape (to lose)
  2. (archaic) present tense of tape (to tape)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

taper

  1. present tense of tape (to lose)

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

VerbEdit

taper

  1. to throw