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See also: hánt, háñt, hänt, ha'n't, ha'nt, and han't

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See haunt.

NounEdit

hant (plural hants)

  1. (US, colloquial, chiefly African American Vernacular) A ghost; a supernatural being.
    • 1907, Harold Bell Wright, New York: A.L. Burt, The Shepherd of the Hills, Chapter I, p. 20,[1]
      [] Say, Mister, did you ever see a hant?”
      The gentleman did not understand.
      “A hant, a ghost, some calls ’em,” explained Jed.
    • 1934, Cecile Hulse Matschat, Suwannee River: Strange Green Land, New York: The Literary Guild of America, Chapter Three, p. 52,[2]
      [] he shivered as though a hant had touched him with its ghostly fingers, for night was near and he was alone in a depth of the swamp where he had never been before.
    • 1967, Richard M. Dorson, American Negro Folktales, Greenwich, Connecticut: Fawcett, “Spirits and Hants,” p. 213,[3]
      The term “hant” covers all malevolent and inexplicable sights and sounds. Primarily hants protect buried treasure and linger about ghoulish death spots.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, New York: Bantam, 1971, Chapter 22, p. 140,[4]
      Naturally, I believed in hants and ghosts and “thangs.” Having been raised by a super-religious Southern Negro grandmother, it would have been abnormal had I not been superstitious.

Etymology 2Edit

ContractionEdit

hant

  1. Eye dialect spelling of hadn’t.

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German hant, from Old High German hant, from Proto-Germanic *handuz (hand). Cognate with German Hand, Dutch hand, English hand, Icelandic hönd.

NounEdit

hant f (plural hénte)

  1. (Sette Comuni, anatomy) hand

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “hant” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒnt]
  • (file)

NounEdit

hant (plural hantok)

  1. clod (lump of earth)
  2. grave (place of burial)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hant hantok
accusative hantot hantokat
dative hantnak hantoknak
instrumental hanttal hantokkal
causal-final hantért hantokért
translative hanttá hantokká
terminative hantig hantokig
essive-formal hantként hantokként
essive-modal
inessive hantban hantokban
superessive hanton hantokon
adessive hantnál hantoknál
illative hantba hantokba
sublative hantra hantokra
allative hanthoz hantokhoz
elative hantból hantokból
delative hantról hantokról
ablative hanttól hantoktól
Possessive forms of hant
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hantom hantjaim
2nd person sing. hantod hantjaid
3rd person sing. hantja hantjai
1st person plural hantunk hantjaink
2nd person plural hantotok hantjaitok
3rd person plural hantjuk hantjaik

Derived termsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch hant, from Proto-Germanic *handuz.

NounEdit

hant f

  1. hand
  2. person
  3. side

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hant”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • hant”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *handuz.

NounEdit

hant f

  1. hand

InflectionEdit

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hant”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *handuz, whence also Old English hand, Old Norse hǫnd, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌿𐍃 (handus).

NounEdit

hant f

  1. (anatomy) hand

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014