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See also: hendé

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ġehende.

AdjectiveEdit

hende (comparative more hende, superlative most hende)

  1. (obsolete) Near, close at hand, handy.
  2. (obsolete) Courteous, gracious.
    • Late 14th century: Oure Hoost þo spak, “A, sire, ye sholde be hende / And curteys, as a man of youre estaat” — Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Friar's Prologue’, Canterbury Tales (OUP 1988, p. 122)
    • 14th century: And if he were so hende and so wis / Þat she ne myȝt al abate his pris, / Yit wolde she blame his worþynesse / Or by hir wordis make it lesse. — Geoffrey Chaucer, The Romaunt of the Rose (OUP 1988, p. 689-90)

DanishEdit

PronounEdit

hende (nominative hun, possessive hendes)

  1. (personal) objective case of hun (she): her

See alsoEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ende.

NounEdit

hende

  1. Alternative form of ende (end)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English æned.

NounEdit

hende

  1. Alternative form of ende (duck)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse henda

VerbEdit

hende (present tense hender, past tense hendte, past participle hendt)

  1. to happen, occur

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse henda

VerbEdit

hende (present tense hender, past tense hende, past participle hendt, passive infinitive hendast, present participle hendande, imperative hend)

  1. to happen, occur

Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit



PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese gente and Spanish gente and Kabuverdianu gentis.

NounEdit

hende

  1. man (human being)
  2. person
  3. someone