See also: Hof, HOF, Hoff, and hóf

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from German Hof. Doublet of howff.

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. Enclosure, court, dwelling, building, house.
    • 1993 May, William, Trevor, Jake's Castle, in Harper's Magazine:
      Ulrike lived in a farm hof, and all around me were the dark blank fields punctuated by a few disparate lights.
    • 2009, Chloe Aridjis, Book of Clouds (New York: Black Cat, 1st edition):
      Like many old houses, this one had a front section, where I lived, and at the back an interior courtyard, the Hof, enclosed on all three sides by more apartments.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse hóf or Old English hof, reinforced in modern (post-1990, chiefly neopagan) use by Icelandic hof (shrine, temple).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: hōf, IPA(key): /hoʊf/
    • (file)

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. (Neopaganism) temple, sanctuary, hall.
    • 1996, Varg Vikernes, cited after Gardell, Gods of the Blood, 2003, p. 307.
      For each ten churches burned to ashes, one heathen hof is avenged.
    • 2005, Michael Strmiska, Modern Paganism In World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives, p. 170.
      Asatruarfelagid lacks a central religious temple, or hof in Icelandic. Constructing a hof has been high on the members' wish list for many years.
    • 2014 November 18, Stubba, The Book of Blots[1], page 102:
      The Candidate for membership of Hof, Garth or Hearth shall hold an Armill, or he may touch an unsheathed Sword throughout the ceremony.

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Korean 호프 (hopeu), in turn from German Hofbräuhaus. In English, the spelling has been re-aligned with the Korean term's etymon.

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. A Korean-style bar or pub.
    • 2009, January 4, “Adam B. Ellick”, in In Queens: A Melting Pot, and a Closed Book[2]:
      To the south are Korean spas, Korean barbecue joints and hofs, or Korean pubs.

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German and Old High German hof, from Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

NounEdit

hof m

  1. garden

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German hof, from Old Saxon hof, from Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą, cognate with German Hof (yard, court, farmyard), Dutch hof (yard, court, garden), Old Norse hof (shrine; court). Doublet of hov (shrine, temple).

NounEdit

hof n (singular definite hoffet, plural indefinite hoffer)

  1. court (family and society of a sovereign)
  2. admirers
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of hofpilsner, from hof (court) +‎ pilsner (lager beer).

NounEdit

hof c (singular definite hoffen, plural indefinite hof)

  1. Carlsberg beer
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch hof, from Old Dutch *hof, from Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n or m (plural hoven, diminutive hofje n)

  1. court, residence of a monarch or other high-placed person
  2. court, entourage of a monarch or other high-placed person
  3. court of law; short form of gerechtshof
  4. court, yard
  5. (Belgium) garden

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: hof
  • Negerhollands: hofje, hofi, hoffie (from the diminutive)
  • Papiamentu: hòfi, hoffie (from the diminutive)

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n (genitive singular hofs, nominative plural hof)

  1. shrine, typically in a home on farm; by extension a temple

DeclensionEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *hof

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n or m

  1. court, enclosed space
  2. garden
  3. farmstead
  4. castle (court of the nobility)

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n (nominative plural hofu)

  1. court, hall
  2. house, building
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōfaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hōf m

  1. a hoof
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Old FrisianEdit

 
Ēn hof.

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą, from Proto-Indo-European *kewp- (to bend). Cognates include Old English hof, Old Saxon hof and Old Dutch *hof.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n

  1. court
DescendantsEdit
  • North Frisian: hof
  • Saterland Frisian: Hoaf
  • West Frisian: hôf
 
Ēn hōf.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱoph₂ós. Cognates include Old English hōf, Old Saxon hōf and Old Dutch *huof.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hōf m

  1. hoof
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hufą (hill, house, temple).

PronunciationEdit

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈhov/

NounEdit

hof n (genitive hofs, plural hof)

  1. shrine, typically in a home of a farm
    • Vǫluspá, verse 7, lines 3-4, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 2:
      [] þeir er hörg ok hof / hátimbruðu, []
      [] they who shrines and temples / high timbered, []
  2. a hall, court
    • Hymiskviða, verse 33, lines 3-4, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 48:
      [] út or óru / ölkjól hofi. []
      [] forth from our house / the cauldron here. []
  3. a royal court

Usage notesEdit

Old Norse makes the distinction between hof "a hall, a sanctuary with a roof" and hǫrgr "an altar, any cult site without a roof". The prevalent meaning of hof in Old Norse literature is "temple, sanctuary". Cleasby and Vigfússon (1874) note the generic meaning "a hall (as in German and Saxon)" in Hymiskviða 33 as a hapax legomenon. The meaning of "court" follows Middle High German and appears only from the 14th century and almost exclusively in compounds such as hof-ferð "pride, pomp", hof-garðr "lordly mansion", hof-fólk "courtiers".

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • hof in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hof in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • hof in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

NounEdit

hof n

  1. dwelling, hovel, house
  2. court, hall
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle Low German: hof

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōfaz.

NounEdit

hōf m

  1. a hoof

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

hof n or c

  1. (neuter) Obsolete spelling of hov (royal court)
  2. (common) Obsolete spelling of hov (hoof)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hof 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hof hofvet hof hofven
Genitive hofs hofvets hofs hofvens
Declension of hof 2
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hof hofven hofvar hofvarna
Genitive hofs hofvens hofvars hofvarnas