See also: Liang, liáng, liàng, and liǎng

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Mandarin (liǎng). Doublet of yang.

NounEdit

liang (plural liangs or liang)

  1. A Chinese ounce or tael, reckoned as one-third heavier than the ounce avoirdupois.

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Malay liang, from Proto-Austronesian *liaŋ (cave, cavern).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlia̯ŋ]
  • Hyphenation: liang

NounEdit

liang (plural liang-liang, first-person possessive liangku, second-person possessive liangmu, third-person possessive liangnya)

  1. small hole.
    Synonym: lubang
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlia̯ŋ]
  • Hyphenation: liang

RootEdit

liang (plural liang-liang)

  1. wavy
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Mandarin (liǎng).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlia̯ŋ]
  • Hyphenation: liang

NounEdit

liang (plural liang-liang, first-person possessive liangku, second-person possessive liangmu, third-person possessive liangnya)

  1. A Chinese ounce or tael, reckoned as one-third heavier than the ounce avoirdupois. Short for 臺兩/台两 (“Taiwanese tael, equal to 1/16 of a catty or 37.5 grams”).

Further readingEdit


KamberaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *liaŋ (cave, cavern).

NounEdit

liang

  1. cave

ReferencesEdit

  • Marian Klamer (1998) A Grammar of Kambera, Berlin, New York: Mouton de Gruyter, →ISBN, page 213

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *liaŋ (cave, cavern). Cognate with Javanese leng.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

liang (Jawi spelling لياڠ‎, plural liang-liang, informal 1st possessive liangku, 2nd possessive liangmu, 3rd possessive liangnya)

  1. small hole (e.g. nose, stab mark)
    Synonyms: lubang, rongga

Further readingEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

liang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of liáng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of liǎng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of liàng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

WoiwurrungEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Pama-Nyungan *rirra.

NounEdit

liang

  1. tooth

ReferencesEdit

  • Barry J. Blake, Woiwurrung, in The Aboriginal Language of Melbourne and Other Sketches (1991; edited by R. M. W. Dixon and Barry J. Blake; OUP, Handbook of Australian Languages 4), pages 31–124