English Edit

Pronunciation Edit

Etymology 1 Edit

Inherited from Middle English former, comparative of forme (first), from Old English forma (first), descended from Proto-Germanic *frumô. Parallel to prior (via Latin), as comparative form from same Proto-Indo-European root. Related to first and fore (thence before), from Proto-Germanic.

Adjective Edit

former (comparative form only)

  1. Previous.
    Synonyms: erstwhile, sometime, whilom, wont-to-be; see also Thesaurus:former
    Antonyms: next; see also Thesaurus:subsequent
    A former president;  the former East Germany
    • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], →OCLC:
      At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    • 2007, Junius P. Rodriguez, Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Transatlantic World:
      The former-slaves-turned-abolitionists Quobna Ottobah Cugoano and Olaudah Equiano were the chief organizers of the Sons of Africa.
  2. First of aforementioned two items. Used with the, often without a noun.
    Antonym: latter
    The former is a good idea but the latter is not.
    We have two cars, a red one and a blue one. We won the former on a game show.
Alternative forms Edit
Derived terms Edit
Translations Edit
See also Edit

Etymology 2 Edit

Inherited from Middle English formere; synchronically form +‎ -er.

Noun Edit

former (plural formers)

  1. Someone who forms something; a maker; a creator or founder.
    Dave was the former of the company.
  2. An object used to form something, such as a template, gauge, or cutting die.
    The brick arch was built using a wooden former.
  3. (chiefly Britain, used in combinations) Someone in, or of, a certain form (class).
    Fifth-former.
    Sixth-former.
Derived terms Edit

Anagrams Edit

Danish Edit

Etymology 1 Edit

Pronunciation Edit

IPA(key): [ˈfɒːmɐ]

Noun Edit

former c

  1. indefinite plural of form

Etymology 2 Edit

Pronunciation Edit

IPA(key): [ˈfɒːmɐ]

Verb Edit

former

  1. present of forme

Etymology 3 Edit

Pronunciation Edit

IPA(key): [fʌˈmeɐ̯ˀ]

Verb Edit

former or formér

  1. imperative of formere

French Edit

Etymology Edit

Inherited from Old French, borrowed from Latin fōrmāre (to form).

Pronunciation Edit

Verb Edit

former

  1. to form (generic sense)
  2. to shape (to make into a certain shape)
  3. to train; to educate

Conjugation Edit

Related terms Edit

Further reading Edit

Latin Edit

Verb Edit

fōrmer

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of fōrmō

Norwegian Bokmål Edit

Noun Edit

former m or f

  1. indefinite plural of form

Verb Edit

former

  1. present of forme

Norwegian Nynorsk Edit

Noun Edit

former f

  1. indefinite plural of form

Swedish Edit

Noun Edit

former

  1. indefinite plural of form

Anagrams Edit