Translingual

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Symbol

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lin

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Lingala.

English

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English linnen, from Old English linnan (to cease from, desist, lose, yield up), from Proto-Germanic *linnaną (to turn, move aside, avoid), from Proto-Indo-European *ley- (to elude, avoid, shrink from). Cognate with Danish linne (to stop, rest), dialectal Swedish linna (to pause, rest), Icelandic linna (to stop, rest).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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lin (third-person singular simple present lins, present participle linning, simple past linned or lan, past participle linned or lun)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To desist, to stop to cease.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “Book I, Canto I”, in The Faerie Queene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC:
      Halfe furious vnto his foe he came, / Resolv'd in minde all suddenly to win, / Or soone to lose, before he once would lin [...].
    • 1684, Meriton, Praise Ale, 1.46 (quoted in the EDD):
      Till all war deaun I knaw thou wad not lin.
    • 1822, The Three Perils of Man, James Hogg, I. 238:
      He never linned till he had taen away every chicken that the wife had.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See English linn.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin (plural lins)

  1. Alternative spelling of linn
    a roaring lin
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion, song 9 p. 134:
      And therefore, to recount her Rivers, from their Lins (marginal gloss) Meeres or Pooles, from whence Rivers spring
    • c. 1735-1801, John Millar, poem, published in 1979, William Christian Lehmann, John Millar of Glasgow, 1735-1801, page 414:
      Here the hammer's active din / Blends with sound of roaring lin.
    • 1776, David Herd, George Paton, Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads, Etc, page 20, "Binnorie":
      Whan they came to the roaring lin, She drave unwitting Isabel in.
    • 1814, J. H. Craig [pseudonym; James Hogg], The Hunting of Badlewe: A Dramatic Tale, London: H[enry] Colburn; Edinburgh: G. Goldie, →OCLC, page 1; quoted in “The Hunting of Badlewe, a Dramatic Tale. 8vo. Edin. 1814. [From the Scottish Review.]”, in The Analectic Magazine, Containing Selections from Foreign Reviews and Magazines, together with Original Miscellaneous Compositions, volume V (New Series), Philadelphia, Pa.: Published and sold by Moses Thomas, [], May 1815, →OCLC, pages 353–354:
      What seek we here / Amid this waste where desolation scowls, / And the red torrent, brawling down the linn, / Sings everlasting discord?
    • 1827, Jane Porter, The Scottish Chiefs, page 51:
      A step farther might be on the firm earth; but more probably it would be illusive, and dash him into the roaring Lin, where he would be ingulfed at once in its furious whirlpool.
    • 1861, Alexander McLachlan, The Emigrant: And Other Poems, page 201:
      O ye were ne ' er the ane to fret,
      But kept my heart aboon,
      Wi ' smiles sweet as when first we met,
      By Locher ' s roaring lin.

Etymology 3

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From Middle English lin, from Old English līn (flax, linen, cloth). For more information, see the entry linen, lint.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin (plural lins)

  1. (Scotland, Ireland, Northern England, especially in compounds) Alternative form of line (flax, linen)
    a lin apron, lin-break, lin-brake, a lin cap, lin-clout, lin-garn/lin-yarn, lin-man, lin-weaver/lin-webster, lin-wheel
    • 1775, John Watson, The History and Antiquities of the Parish of Halifax, page 16:
      [] to Sowerby-bridge, about twenty-four measured miles, wheel carriages would go in one day; and on that account they concluded that the manufacture of that place, Warrington, &c. would be much readier and cheaper supplied with lin-yarn, flax, &c. from the east, []
      1641.—14 yards of femble cloth, 12s. ; 8 yards of linen, 6s. 8d. ; 20 yards of harden, 10s. ; 5 linen sheets, 1l. ; 7 linen pillow bears, 8s. ; 2 femble sheets and a line hard sheet, 10s. ; 3 linen towels, 4s. ; 6 lin curtains and a vallance, 12s. ; []
    • 1864, Poems, Preston, section 8:
      A yerd a gooid lin check.
    • 1866, Gilpin, Songs, 233:
      Paddeys wi' their feyne lin' ware.
    • 1874 (ed. of 1879), Waugh, Chim. Corner, 27:
      Hoo wur stonnin' i' th' front of a weshin'-mug, wi' a lin brat afore her.

References

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Anagrams

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Chinese

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Etymology

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Romanisation of 𢆡 (nin1).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) Nonstandard form of 𢆡 (nipple). (Classifier: c)

Cornish

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Etymology 1

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From Latin linum

Noun

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lin m (singulative linen)

  1. linen, flax

Etymology 2

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From Latin linea

Noun

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lin m (plural linyow)

  1. line

Etymology 3

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From Proto-Celtic *lī-no-.

Noun

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lin m (plural linyow)

  1. fluid, liquid
  2. lotion

Etymology 4

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Noun

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lin

  1. Soft mutation of glin.

Esperanto

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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lin

  1. accusative of li; him

French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French, from Latin līnum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin m (plural lins)

  1. linen
  2. flax (the plant)
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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Friulian

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Etymology

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From Latin līnum.

Noun

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lin m

  1. linen
  2. flax
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Galician

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Verb

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lin

  1. first-person plural preterite indicative of ler

Indonesian

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Etymology

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From Dutch lijn.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪn]
  • Hyphenation: lin

Noun

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lin

  1. line
    Synonym: garis
  2. band
    Synonym: pita
  3. a route, a line (of transport, especially of public transport and airlines).
    Synonyms: jalur, rute

Further reading

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Mandarin

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Romanization

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lin

  1. Nonstandard spelling of līn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of lín.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of lǐn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of lìn.

Usage notes

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  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English

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Noun

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lin (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of lyne

References

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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From Latin linum, via Old Norse lín.

Noun

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lin n (definite singular linet)

  1. (botany) flax
  2. (fabric) linen

Derived terms

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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From Latin linum, via Old Norse lín.

Noun

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lin n (definite singular linet)

  1. (botany) flax
  2. (fabric) linen

Derived terms

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References

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Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *līnǭ (line, rope, flaxen cord, thread), from Proto-Germanic *līną (flax, linen), from Proto-Indo-European *līno- (flax).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin n

  1. linen, flax

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • English: lin
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Old French

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Etymology

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From Latin linea (a line).

Noun

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lin oblique singularm (oblique plural lins, nominative singular lins, nominative plural lin)

  1. line (lineage; descent)

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
 
lin

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *linъ, further etymology uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Slavic *linjati, see Russian линь (linʹ).

Noun

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lin m animal

  1. tench (Tinca tinca)
Declension
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

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lin f

  1. genitive plural of lina

Further reading

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  • lin in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lin in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Vulgar Latin *lenus, from Latin lenis.

Adjective

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lin m or n (feminine singular lină, masculine plural lini, feminine and neuter plural line)

  1. even, smooth
    Synonym: neted
  2. calm, quiet
    Synonyms: calm, liniștit
  3. mild, gentle, sweet
    Synonym: blând
Declension
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Derived terms
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See also
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Bulgarian лин (lin), from Proto-Slavic *linъ.

Noun

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lin m (plural lini)

  1. tench (Tinca tinca)
Declension
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Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv
 
lin

Etymology

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From Old Norse lín, from Proto-Germanic *līną. Cognate with English linen.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin n

  1. flax (plant)

Declension

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Declension of lin 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative lin linet
Genitive lins linets
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See also

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Venetian

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Etymology

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From Latin līnum. Compare Italian lino.

Noun

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lin m (plural lini)

  1. flax
  2. linen (fibre)

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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lin

  1. Soft mutation of glin.

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
glin lin nglin unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Noun

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lin

  1. Soft mutation of llin.

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llin lin unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.