Translingual edit

Symbol edit

li

  1. (mathematics) The symbol for the logarithmic integral function.
  2. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Limburgish.

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /liː/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iː

Etymology 1 edit

An early romanization of Chinese Mandarin (). As a Korean unit, via the Yale romanization of Korean (ri), from the Chinese distance.

Alternative forms edit

  • (Korea): ri

Noun edit

li (plural lis or li)

  1. The Chinese mile, a traditional unit of distance equal to 1500 chis or 150 zhangs, now standardized as a half-kilometer (500 meters).
    Synonym: Chinese mile
    • 1927, Chi Li, “Archaeological Survey of the Fêng River Valley, Southern Shansi, China”, in Explorations and Field-work of the Smithsonian Institution in 1926 (Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections)‎[1], volume 78, number 7, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, →OCLC, page 129:
      It was a whole day's journey from I-ch'eng to Chü-wo which, in turn, is about 60 li east of Chiang Chou — one of the most important cities in southern Shansi and a center for curio-dealers.
    • 1999 [1994], Heng (邹衡) Zou, “The Early Jin State Capital Discovered: a Personal Account”, in Roderick Whitfield, Wang Tao, transl., Exploring China's Past: New Discoveries and Studies in Archaeology and Art[2], Saffron Books, Eastern Art Publishing, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 106:
      In 1979, while we were conducting our archaeological work in Yucheng and Quwo, Shanxi province, I noticed another historical record in the Kuodizhi (a comprehensive account of geography written in 641), which stated that "the ancient city of Tang was 20 li west of Yuchengxian in Jiangzhou."
    • 2000, Shui-Bian Chen, “Learning and Transformation”, in David J. Toman, transl., The Son of Taiwan: The Life of Chen Shui-Bian and His Dreams for Taiwan[3], Taiwan Publishing Co., Ltd., →ISBN, →OCLC, page 40:
      The two gods who accompany Matsu, one with eyes that can see 1000 li⁶ and the other with ears that can hear far over the horizon, represent empathy, observation, and feeling. Government should be like Matsu, equipped with acute powers of observation; see clearly to the bottom of issues, and know how to respond.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:li.
  2. The Korean mile, a traditional unit of distance equivalent to about 393 m.
    Synonym: Korean mile
    • 1980, Il-sung Kim, “Meeting with My Comrades-in-Arms in North Manchuria”, in Kim Il Sung Works[4], volume 48, Pyongyang: Foreign Languages Publishing House, →OCLC, page 144:
      While scaling the Laoyeling Mountains, the Chinese Worker-Peasant Red Army, under the command of Mao Ze-dong and Zhu De, was successfully stepping up the historic 25 000-li Long March in China proper, breaking through the surrounding rings formed by Chiang Kai-shek’s army.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Mandarin 市厘 ().

Noun edit

li (plural li)

  1. A traditional Chinese unit of weight, equal to one-thousandth of a liang, or fifty milligrams.

Etymology 3 edit

From Mandarin ().

Noun edit

li (plural li)

  1. (Chinese philosophy) A meaningful ceremony or ritual; etiquette, behaviour.

Etymology 4 edit

From Mandarin ().

Noun edit

li (plural li)

  1. An ancient Chinese cauldron having three hollow legs.

Etymology 5 edit

Altered from la, with the vowel changed to signify a raised note.

Noun edit

li (uncountable)

  1. (music) In solfège, the raised sixth note of a major scale (the note A-sharp in the fixed-do system).
    Synonyms: A-sharp, B-flat, ta, te

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Orel suggests from South Slavic, compare Serbo-Croatian lȉh (exclusive), lȋh (false, odd), Slovene lȋh (uneven, odd).[1] However, generally thought to be from Ancient Greek εὐλογία (eulogía) "blessing", with a euphemistic sense development.[2][3] Compare e.g. the euphemistic synonym "e lume" (the happy/blessed one)[4]

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

li f (definite lia)

  1. pox
  2. olive scab, peacock spot (Cycloconium oleaginum)
    Synonym: sypallua
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “lijë”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 227
  2. ^ Eqrem Çabej, Studime etimologjike në fushë të shqipes, Akademia e Shkencave e RPS të Shqipërisë, Instituti i Gjuhësisë dhe i Letërsisë, 1996, page 168
  3. ^ Eqrem Çabej, Studime Filologjike, Akademia e Shkencave e RPSSH, Instituti i Gjuhësisë dje i Letërsisë., 1990, page 99
  4. ^ Eqrem Çabej, Studime gjuhësore: Nga historia e gjuhës shqipe, Rilindja, 1977, page 22

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin līnum.

Noun edit

li m (definite liri)

  1. flax

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ille (that one).

Pronoun edit

li

  1. him (indirect object)

Synonyms edit

Aromanian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin illis, dative common plural of ille. Compare Romanian le.

Pronoun edit

li f (short/unstressed accusative form of eali)

  1. (direct object) them (all-female group)

Related terms edit

  • (feminine/masculine plural dative- short/unstressed form)
  • u (feminine singular accusative- short/unstressed form)
  • (a) lor (feminine/masculine plural dative- long/stressed form)

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin illī, dative common singular of ille.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li (enclitic and proclitic)

  1. him, her, it (indirect object, singular all genders)
    doneu-li una monedagive him/her a coin

Declension edit

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From Latin illi, masculine plural of ille, from Old Latin olle. Cognates include Italian gli (the, them) and Romanian îi (them).

Pronoun edit

li

  1. him, her (indirect object)
  2. them (indirect object)
  3. Archaic form of i.

See also edit

Article edit

li

  1. Archaic form of i.

References edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

li m (uncountable)

  1. li (Chinese unit of distance).

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From Italian lui, French lui, or Spanish le, plus the i of personal pronouns.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li (accusative lin, possessive lia)

  1. (personal pronoun) he

Usage notes edit

  • Li is traditionally used as both a masculine and a gender-neutral pronoun, but since the 1970s generic usage has sometimes been criticized and is increasingly being avoided and replaced by "li aŭ ŝi". Some people think this is an imperfect solution which is inappropriately long. In response to such criticisms, there have been various proposals for new pronouns, but the only proposal that has been gaining some adoption is ri.

Synonyms edit

  • (person whose gender is unknown): ri, ŝli

Related terms edit

  • ili (they) (plural)

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Mandarin ().

Noun edit

li m (plural lis)

  1. li (Chinese unit of distance)

Etymology 2 edit

Probably from influence of Louisiana Creole li (he, she, it).

Pronoun edit

li (second person singular, objective case)

  1. (Louisiana) him
  2. (Louisiana) it

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

li

  1. (reintegrationist norm) first-person singular preterite indicative of ler

Guinea-Bissau Creole edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese ali. Cognate with Kabuverdianu li.

Adverb edit

li

  1. here

Haitian Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French lui.

Pronoun edit

li (contracted form l)

  1. he
  2. him
  3. she
  4. her
  5. it

Etymology 2 edit

From French lire.

Verb edit

li

  1. to read

Ido edit

Etymology edit

From lu (he, him, she, her, it, that) +‎ -i (-s; plural).

Pronoun edit

li pl

  1. they, them

Related terms edit

  • ili (they, them, masculine)
  • eli (they, them, feminine)
  • oli (they, them, neuter)

Istriot edit

Article edit

li

  1. masculine plural definite article
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin illī, nominative masculine plural of ille.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): °/li/°
  • Homophone:
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Hyphenation: li
  • As an unstressed clitic, it does not trigger syntactic gemination of the following consonant. It also actively blocks syntactic gemination of its initial consonant, such as after a word like però (but) that would normally trigger syntactic gemination. (This does not apply to the enclitic form -li, e.g. dalli a me (give them to me).)

Pronoun edit

li m pl

  1. (accusative) them (masculine)
    Li ricordo.I remember them.
Usage notes edit
  • Never elides.
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Variant of gli.

Article edit

li m pl (singular lo)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of gli
    li studentithe students

Pronoun edit

li m pl (singular lo)

  1. (dative, archaic) Alternative form of gli

Etymology 3 edit

Adverb edit

li

  1. Misspelling of .

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

li

  1. Rōmaji transcription of り゚
  2. Rōmaji transcription of リ゚

Jarawa edit

Etymology edit

Cognate to Önge li.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

li

  1. this, these
    Synonym: lijə (this here, this)
    Coordinate term: luwə (that)
    li aːw ʈʰi talu.
    This bow is long.

Pronoun edit

li

  1. this, these, this one, these ones
    Coordinate term: luwə (that)
    li topo t-ita-b.
    He ate the snake.
    li aːw.
    This is a bow.

References edit

  • Kumar, Pramod (2012) Descriptive and Typological Study of Jarawa[5] (PhD). Jawaharlal Nehru University. Page 85, 101—102.

Kabuverdianu edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese ali.

Adverb edit

li

  1. here

Khumi Chin edit

 
Li.

Etymology edit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *lii, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *d-liy. Cognate to Burmese လေး (le:, bow) and S'gaw Karen ချံၣ် (khleè, bow).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

li

  1. crossbow

References edit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[6], Payap University, page 45

Livonian edit

Verb edit

li

  1. second-person singular imperative of lǟdõ

Louisiana Creole edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “May be unrelated to French "il" or "lui".”)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li (third-person singular, plural , objective li, possessive , emphatic sokin, sochin)

  1. he
  2. him
  3. she
  4. her
  5. it

Descendants edit

  • French: li

Maltese edit

Alternative forms edit

  • illi (after a word-final consonant cluster)

Etymology edit

From Arabicاَلَّذِي(allaḏī, relative pronoun). Compare common dialectal Arabicاللي(illi, lli). The use as a conjunction is widely found in Maghrebi Arabic, so there is no reason to consider it a Romance influence (as might otherwise be thought; compare Italian che, which is both a relative pronoun and the conjunction “that”).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li

  1. (relative) who; which; that
    Dan huwa r-raġel li seraq il-karozza.That’s the man who stole the car.
    Din hija ħaġa li tħawwadni.This is something that confuses me.

Usage notes edit

  • Unlike standard Arabic, the relative pronoun is normally used also with indefinite referents (example sentence 2). However, it is optional in this case.

Conjunction edit

li

  1. that
    Nixtieq ngħidilha li nħobbha.I want to tell her that I love her.

Derived terms edit

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

li (li5li0, Zhuyin ˙ㄌㄧ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  2. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  3. Hanyu Pinyin reading of
  4. Hanyu Pinyin reading of

li

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Mauritian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French le, lui.

Pronoun edit

li

  1. he, she, it (third-person singular personal pronoun)

See also edit

Michif edit

Etymology edit

From French le.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

li m (feminine la, masculine and feminine plural lii)

  1. the

Miskito edit

Noun edit

li

  1. water

References edit

  • Eduard Conzemius, Ethnographical Survey of the Miskito and Sumu Indians (1932)

Mokilese edit

Noun edit

li

  1. woman

Moore edit

Etymology edit

from French lit (bed)

Pronunciation edit

IPA(key): /lí/

Noun edit

li

  1. bed

Munsee edit

Particle edit

[1]

  1. here, there, thus, so

References edit

  1. ^ O'Meara, John (2014), “lí-”, in Delaware-English/English-Delaware Dictionary (Heritage), Toronto: University of Toronto Press, published 1996, →ISBN

Neapolitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li

  1. Alternative form of 'i

Niuatoputapu edit

Article edit

li

  1. the

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French li, from Vulgar Latin *illui, a Vulgar Latin dative of Classical Latin ille.

Pronoun edit

li

  1. (Guernsey) him

Northern Kurdish edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *en.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

Central Kurdish لە(le)

li

  1. in
    li Kurdistanêin Kurdistan
  2. an element of several prepositions and circumpositions

Related terms edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hlíð.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

li f or m (definite singular lia or lien, indefinite plural lier, definite plural liene)

  1. A sloping mountainside or hillside covered with grass or forest.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse hlíð, from Proto-Germanic *hlīdō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱleytéh₂ (something leaned, inclined).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

li f (definite singular lia, indefinite plural lier, definite plural liene)

  1. a sloping mountainside or hillside covered with grass or forest.
Inflection edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse líða, from Proto-Germanic *līþaną. The sense of suffering may be a loan from Middle Low German.

Alternative forms edit

Verb edit

li (present tense lir, past tense lei, supine lidd or lidt or liden, past participle lidd or liden, present participle lidande, imperative li)

  1. (intransitive, of time) to pass, elapse
  2. (intransitive) to suffer
    1. (intransitive) to endure
    2. (intransitive) to tolerate, like
Related terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ille (that). In the nominative singular, it was influenced by the nom. sg. form of the pronoun quī.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

li

  1. the (masculine nominative singular and plural definite article)
Inflection edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin illī (to that one), dative singular of Latin ille. Cognate of Spanish le, Portuguese lhe, Italian gli.

Pronoun edit

li

  1. third-person singular indirect object pronoun; to him, to her, to it
Descendants edit

Old Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ille (that).

Article edit

li

  1. the (masculine nominative singular and plural definite article)

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *li.[1][2] First attested in 1395. Displaced by Polish czy.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /lʲi/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /lʲi/

Particle edit

li

  1. interrogative particle: introduces a yes-no question
  2. (when reduplicated) whetheror
  3. (when reduplicated) bothand

Conjunction edit

li

  1. if

Derived terms edit

conjunctions

Related terms edit

conjunction

Descendants edit

  • Polish: li

References edit

  1. ^ Boryś, Wiesław (2005), “li”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego (in Polish), Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, →ISBN
  2. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “li”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Polish li, from Proto-Slavic *li.[1][2]

Particle edit

li

  1. (archaic, literary) interrogative particle: introduces a yes-no question
    Synonym: czy
  2. (archaic, literary) only
    Synonyms: jedynie, tylko
  3. (Middle Polish) emphasis particle

Conjunction edit

li

  1. (obsolete) if
    Synonym: jeśli
  2. (Middle Polish) since, because
    Synonym: skoro
  3. (Middle Polish) though
    Synonyms: acz, aczkolwiek, chociaż, mimo że
  4. (Middle Polish) when
    Synonym: kiedy
  5. (Middle Polish) or
    Synonyms: albo, bądź, czy, lub
Derived terms edit
conjunctions
Related terms edit
conjunctions

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Mandarin ().

Noun edit

li n (indeclinable)

  1. li (Chinese unit of distance)
  2. li (Chinese unit of weight)

Etymology 3 edit

From Mandarin ().

Noun edit

li n (indeclinable)

  1. li (meaningful ceremony or ritual)

References edit

  1. ^ Boryś, Wiesław (2005), “li”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego (in Polish), Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, →ISBN
  2. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “li”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)
  • li”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish], 2010-2023

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: li
  • Rhymes: -i

Verb edit

li

  1. first-person singular preterite indicative of ler

Romagnol edit

Pronoun edit

li (plural le)

  1. she

References edit

Ercolani, Libero (1971) Vocabolario Romagnolo-Italiano, Monte di Ravenna, page 232

Romanian edit

Pronoun edit

li (dative form of ele, form of le)

  1. to them

Usage notes edit

This word is used when le (which is dative) is combined with the following accusatives:

  • îl (the accusative of el, contracted as li-l)
  • îi (the accusative of ei, contracted as li-i)
  • le (the accusative of ele)
  • se (the reflexive accusative of all third-person pronouns)

See also edit

Sassarese edit

Alternative forms edit

  • -lli (pronoun, enclitic, used when previous syllable is stressed)
  • -ri (pronoun, enclitic, used when previous syllable is unstressed)

Etymology edit

From Latin illī, illae, masculine and feminine plural forms of ille (that).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /li/, (after a word ending in a vowel) /ri/

Article edit

li m pl or f pl

Sassarese definite articles
singular plural
masculine lu/l' li/l'
feminine la/l'
  1. the (masculine and feminine plural)

Usage notes edit

  • Becomes l' before a vowel.

Pronoun edit

li m pl or f pl

  1. (followed by chi) those
    Di curori vi ni so umbè. Ca so li chi tu priferi?
    There are lots of colors. Which ones do you prefer?
    (literally, “Of colors there are a lot. Which ones are those which you prefer?”)
  2. them (accusative)
    Abà li zerchuI'll look for them (literally, “Now I look for them”)
  3. dative of eddu
    Li cuzinu la trìgliaI'll prepare him mullet (literally, “I cook to him the mullet”)
  4. dative of edda
    Li fozzu li frisgioriI'll prepare her some flapjacks (literally, “I make to her the flapjacks”)
  5. dative of eddi

References edit

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006) Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *li.

Pronunciation edit

Particle edit

li (Cyrillic spelling ли)

  1. question-forming interrogative particle (postpositive, unlike other particles, never first word in a sentence)
    poznaješ li medo you know me?
    jesi li stigao na odredište?did you reach the destination?
    jeste li ga vid(j)elihave you seen him?
    gd(j)e li se samo nalazimo?where could we be?
    kad li će doći?when will he/they come?
    je li?Is it? (Is that so? Isn't that so?)
  2. used as conjunction with da (except in Croatian, je li is used instead)
    da liwhether
    nemam pojma da li je došaoI have no idea whether he came (Croatian: "nemam pojma je li došao")
  3. (as a conjunction) if
    pokušaš li me napasti, ja ću ti uzvratitishould you try to attack me, I'll strike you back (when "li" is used in this sense, it is usually translated as a subjunctive form "should", and when "ako" is used, it is usually translated as "if" - ako me pokušaš napasti = if you try to attack me)
  4. used as an emphatic intensifier
    a sn(ij)eg pada li padathe snow just keeps falling and falling...
    d(ij)ete plače li plačethe child just keeps crying and crying...

See also edit

  • zar (interrogative particle)

Sicilian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the conflation of the apheresis of Latin illī and illae, both nominative plurals of ille.

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

li m pl or f pl

  1. (masculine and feminine plural definite article) the
    Synonym: i
Usage notes edit
  • This article is nowadays an obsolete variant, unlike its illiquid counterpart i. It is currently used only in some restricted areas where it is still withheld in conversational communications.
  • Today it is mostly used in crystallized contexts, such as singing, poetry or sayings and proverbs. In all these cases this definite article is more euphonetic than the variants, now predominant, which have undergone the lenition of the initial liquid consonant.
  • Its use is however almost undisputed before nouns (or nominalized forms of other parts of speech, most often adjectives) that begin with vowels. In this case the form is an apocopic l'. Otherwise, illiquid definite articles are phonetically absorbed by the following noun. I.e: l'arancini (liquid) and ârancini (illiquid).
Inflection edit
Sicilian articles
Masculine singular definite article Feminine singular definite article Masculine and feminine plural definite article
Definite articles (liquid) lu la li
Definite articles (illiquid) u a i
Definite articles nu
(also: un, 'n)
na

Etymology 2 edit

From the conflation of the apheresis of Latin illī and illae, both nominative plurals of ille.

Alternative forms edit

  • -li (enclitic)
  • i (illiquid form)

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

li m pl or f pl

  1. (accusative) them
    Synonym: i
    Li canusci?Do you know them?
  2. (accusative) them, these or those thing
    Synonym: i
    Quannu ti li desi.When I gave them to you.
Usage notes edit
  • This pronoun is now an obsolete variant. It is currently used only in some restricted areas where it is still withheld in conversational communications.
  • Today it is mostly used in crystallized contexts, such as singing, poetry or sayings and proverbs. In all these cases this definite article is more euphonetic than the variants, now predominant, which have undergone the lenition of the initial liquid consonant.
  • Its use is however almost undisputed before words that begin with vowels. In this case the form is an apocopic l'.

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

li

  1. Romanization of 𒇷 (li)

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

-li

  1. general relative positive degree stem of -wa, -wapo, -wako, or -wamo
    mambo yaliomothe things which are inside

Tedim Chin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *b-ləj.

Numeral edit

li

  1. four

References edit

  • Zomi Ordbog based on the work of D.L. Haokip

Tooro edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Bantu *dɪ̀ (to be, irregular verb). Cognate with Kikuyu -rĩ.

Verb edit

-li (defective)

  1. to be, to exist
    Synonyms: -ba, ni
    Tuli Batooro.We are Tooro people.
    • 2008, Ekitabu Ekirukwera N'Ebitabu Ebyeetwa Deturokanoniko/Apokurifa [Bible in Runyoro/Rutooro Interconfessional Translation], Bible Society of Uganda, Okubanza

 [https://www.bible.com/bible/2806/

GEN.4.9 4:9]:

Aho MUKAMA yakaguza Kaini ati: “Abberi owanyoko ali nkaha?” Kaini yagarukamu ati: “Tindukumanya; ninyowe mulinzi w'Owanyina nyowe?”
Then the Lord said to Cain, “Where is your brother Abel?” “I don’t know,” he replied. “Am I my brother’s keeper?”
  1. to become
    Synonym: -ba
Usage notes edit
  • Since this is a defective verb, it does not have many conjugations, and the remaining conjugations needed are constructed using -ba as an auxiliary verb. For example, the 1st person singular negative remote past of -li is nkaba ntali (literally, “I was not being”).
  • This verb removes the augment of the noun after it (e.g. ndi manzi, not *ndi emanzi "I am a courageous person").
  • The 3rd person singular present and 3rd person plural present forms are usually only used after a locative class or a place name. In other cases, the noun is almost always left augmentless (e.g. muntu "he/she is a person").
Conjugation edit
Derived terms edit
  • -roho (to be at/on something, to be present)
  • -rumu (to be in something)
  • -liyo (to be there)
  • -raha (where is it?, where are they?)
  • -ruku-, -liku-

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Bantu *dɪ́á (that, those). Cognate with Swahili -le.

Determiner edit

-li

  1. that, those (distal demonstrative determiner)
Declension edit
See also edit
  • -nu (this (proximal demonstrative determiner))

References edit

Vietnamese edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from (glass).

Noun edit

(classifier cái) li

  1. cup; glass
Derived terms edit
Derived terms

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

li

  1. a crease (a line or mark made by folding or doubling any pliable substance)

Volapük edit

Particle edit

li

  1. Appended with a hyphen to a verb, it turns the entire clause it is in into a question.

Walloon edit

Pronunciation edit

Article edit

li (after an open syllable and/or before a vowel: l', plural: les, plural after an open syllable and before a vowel: ls)

  1. the
    Li mwaisseThe master
    Li maistreceThe mistress
    L' omeThe man
    C' est li l' mwaisseHe is the master
    Les måjhonsThe houses
    Les omesThe men
    Çou sont ls åtes tchesteasThese are the other castles

Pronoun edit

li

  1. him, her, it (direct object, before verb)
    C' est li l' mwaisseIt's him who's the master

West Makian edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

li

  1. also

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[8], Pacific linguistics

Yoruba edit

Pronunciation edit

IPA(key): /lí/

Noun edit

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter L.

See also edit

Zou edit

Zou cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : li

Etymology edit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *lii, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *b-ləj. Cognates include Burmese လေး (le:) and Nuosu (ly).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /lī/
  • Hyphenation: li

Numeral edit

li

  1. four

References edit

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 40
  • Philip Thanglienmang (2014), “Zou Tonology”, in Indian Linguistics, volume 75, issue 1-2, →ISSN