See also: Linn and linn-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Scottish Gaelic or Irish linn, conflated to some extent with linn (waterfall).

NounEdit

linn (plural linns)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) A pool of water, especially one below a waterfall.
    • 1868 September 24, James Hardy, addressed delivered at Chirnside, quoted in the History of the Berwickshire Naturalists' Club, volume 5, page 386:
      The pool is there — the true linn, in the original acceptance of the word — dark and bottomless.
    • 1812, Forbes, Poems, 49:
      There frisks the freckl'd finny tribe,
      In linns both wide and steep.
    • 1823, Galt, Gilhaize, xxviii:
      In the clear linn the trouts shuttled from stone and crevice.
    • 1894, Haliburton, Furth, 177:
      His successful angler landing the linn-lier [fish that inhabits a pool of water].
    • 1896, Crockett, Grey Man, vii:
      The running of deep water in a linn.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English *linne, from Old English hlynn (torrent), though this and linn (pool) have been somewhat conflated.

NounEdit

linn (plural linns)

  1. (UK dialectal, especially Scotland, Northern England) A waterfall or cataract, or a ravine down which its water rushes.
    • 1814, J. H. Craig [pseudonym; James Hogg], The Hunting of Badlewe: A Dramatic Tale, London: H[enry] Colburn; Edinburgh: G. Goldie, OCLC 612459984, page 1; quoted in “The Hunting of Badlewe, a Dramatic Tale. 8vo. Edin. 1814. [From the Scottish Review.]”, in The Analectic Magazine, Containing Selections from Foreign Reviews and Magazines, together with Original Miscellaneous Compositions, volume V (New Series), Philadelphia, Pa.: Published and sold by Moses Thomas, [], May 1815, OCLC 974441451, pages 353–354:
      What seek we here / Amid this waste where desolation scowls, / And the red torrent, brawling down the linn, / Sings everlasting discord?
    • 1844 December, The Legend of Stumpie's Brae, in The Dublin University Magazine, page 720:
      "For it's o'er the bank, and it's o'er the linn,
      "And it's up to the meadow ridge—"
      "Ay," quo' the Stumpie hirpling in,
    • 1866, John Harland, Lancashire Lyrics: Modern Songs & Ballads of the County Balatine, 85:
      And the roaring of the linn.
    • 1896, Lewis Proudlock, The Borderland Muse, page 51:
      Hear! now, Yon linn's melodious thunder!
Alternative formsEdit

EstonianEdit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Proto-Finnic *litna. Compare Finnish linna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

linn (genitive linna, partitive linna)

  1. city (large settlement)
  2. (archaeology) fortified settlement

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

nouns

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish lind (pool, lake; sea, ocean), from Proto-Celtic *lindos (lake, liquid).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

linn f (genitive singular linne, nominative plural linnte)

  1. pool, pond; body of water, lake, sea
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish linn (period, space of time).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

linn f (genitive singular linne)

  1. space of time, period
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

linn (emphatic linne)

  1. first-person plural of le: with us, to us

Further readingEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. Possibly from Old Norse *linnr, from Proto-Germanic *linþaz. Related to linnorm.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

linn (masculine and feminine lin, neuter lint, definite singular and plural linne, comparative linnare, indefinite superlative linnast, definite superlative linnaste)

  1. weak

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

linn

  1. first-person plural of la
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14c2a
      Gigeste-si Día linn ara·fulsam ar fochidi.
      You pl will pray to God for us so that we may endure our sufferings.
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 207b11
      Cit comṡuidigthi la Grécu ní écen dúnni beta comṡuidigthi linn.
      Although they are compounds in Greek (lit. with the Greeks), it is not necessary for us that they be compounds in our language (lit. with us).

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish linn (period, space of time).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

linn m or f (genitive singular linn or linne, plural linntean)

  1. era, age, period
    Linn ÙrNew Age
    Linn an UmhaBronze Age
  2. century
    san 20mh linnin the 20th century
  3. generation (genealogy)
    bho linn gu linnfrom generation to generation
  4. offspring, clutch

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit