See also: Him, hím, HIM, and H.I.M.

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

him

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 language code for Western Pahari languages.

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English him, from Old English him, from Proto-Germanic *himmai (to this, to this one). Cognate with Saterland Frisian him (him), West Frisian him (him), Sylt North Frisian ham, höm (him), Dutch hem (him), German Low German hum, hüm, em (him), German ihm (him, dative).

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK, US) enPR: hĭm, IPA(key): /ˈhɪm/, unstressed IPA(key): /əm/, [ɪ̈m]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm
  • Homophone: hymn,'em for unstressed in some pronunciations.

Pronoun edit

him (personal pronoun, objective case)

  1. A masculine pronoun; he as a grammatical object.
    1. With dative effect or as an indirect object. [from 9th c.]
      • 1529, John Frith, A piſtle to the Chriſten reader [] [1]:
        [] therfoꝛ Chꝛiſt wold not call him abominable / But the verye abomination it ſilf.
      • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, New York, N.Y.: Modern Library, →OCLC:
        ‘I promise,’ he said as I gave him the papers.
    2. Following a preposition. [from 9th c.]
    3. With accusative effect or as a direct object. [from 12th c.]
  2. (colloquial) As a grammatical subject or object when joined with a conjunction.
    Now him and Bernie are best friends.
    Released a [statement] warning that him and 25,000 troops were going to stage a coup.
  3. (now rare) Used reflexively: (to) himself. [from 9th c.]
  4. With nominative effect: he, especially as a predicate after be, or following a preposition. [from 15th c.]
    • c. 1606 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act V, scene x]:
      Before my body, I throw my warlike Shield: Lay on Macduffe, And damn'd be him, that first cries hold, enough.
    • 2003 June 11, Claire Cozens, The Guardian:
      Lowe quit the West Wing last year amid rumours that he was unhappy that his co-stars earned more than him.
  5. (slang) A person of elevated skill at a sport, game, or other activity.
    Stop trying that, you're not him bro.
    Bro thinks he's him.
    HE'S HIM
    • 2023 October 25, u/baggypantsman, “Super Mario 64 - 0 Star in 6:16 by Suigi”, in Reddit[2], r/speedrun, archived from the original on 23 December 2023:
      Watched this one live, he randomly got it less than an hour into the stream while derusting for PACE. He's just him.

Descendants edit

  • Jamaican Creole: im
  • Pijin: hem
  • Pijin: -im

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

See also edit

Noun edit

him (plural hims)

  1. (informal) A male person or animal.
    Synonym: he
    I think this bird is a him, but it may be a her.
    • 1985, Hélène Cixous, Sorties (translated)
      [] daring dizzying passages in other, fleeting and passionate dwellings within the hims and hers whom she inhabits []
    • 2004, Tom Wolfe, I Am Charlotte Simmons: A Novel[3]:
      Both hims took a good look at him.
    • 2004, Charles J. Sullivan, Love and Survival, page 68:
      By this time, she had so many questions, but she only hit him up for one answer about those “hims” and “hers.” She asked, “Do both hims and hers reproduce hummers?”

References edit

Anagrams edit

Gayón edit

Noun edit

him

  1. water

References edit

  • Luis Oramas, Materiales para el estudio de los dialectos Ayamán, Gayón, Jirajara, Ajagua (1916)

Irish edit

Noun edit

him m

  1. h-prothesized form of im

Luxembourgish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. third-person masculine singular, dative: him, to him
    Ech baken him e Kuch.
    I'm baking him a cake.
  2. third-person neuter singular, dative: her, to her; (rarely: it, to it)
    Hie war gëschter mat him am Kino.
    He went to the cinema with her yesterday.

Usage notes edit

  • For the use of the neuter for referring to female persons, see hatt.

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English him. Originally a dative form; gradually displaced accusative hine.

Alternative forms edit

Pronoun edit

him (nominative he)

  1. Third-person singular masculine pronoun indicating a grammatical object: him.
  2. (reflexive) himself.
  3. Third-person singular neuter pronoun indicating a grammatical object: it.
  4. (impersonal) Third-person singular neuter pronoun indicating a grammatical object one, you.
Descendants edit
See also edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. Alternative form of hem (them)

Mizo edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

him

  1. safe
  2. unscathed

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

him

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of heim

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. dative of : him
  2. dative of hit: it
  3. dative of hīe: them

Descendants edit

Old Frisian edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. dative of ; him

Inflection edit

Saterland Frisian edit

Etymology edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. oblique of hie; him

See also edit

References edit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “him”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Sursurunga edit

Verb edit

him

  1. to work

Further reading edit

  • Sursurunga Organised Phonology Data (2011)

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian him, from Proto-Germanic *himmai.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

him

  1. object of hy

Yola edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English him, from Old English him.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /hɪm/, /ɛm/, /ham/

Pronoun edit

him

  1. him
    • 1867, “SONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 3, page 108:
      Shoo zent him o' die.
      She sent him one day.
    • 1867, “SONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 6, page 108:
      Shoo zent him anoor die a gozleen to keep;
      She sent him another day the goslings to keep;

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 108