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See also: Lune, luné, luñè, l'une, łune, and łunę

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin luna (moon).

NounEdit

lune (plural lunes)

  1. (obsolete) A fit of lunacy or madness; a period of frenzy; a crazy or unreasonable freak.
    • 1623, Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale:
      These dangerous, unsafe lunes i' the king.

Etymology 2Edit

From French lune, from Latin luna.

NounEdit

lune (plural lunes)

  1. A concave figure formed by the intersection of the arcs of two circles on a plane, or on a sphere the intersection between two great semicircles.
    • 1984, Thomas Pynchon, Slow Learner:
      What he worried about was any eventual convexity, a shrinking, it might be, of the planet itself to some palpable curvature of whatever he would be standing on, so that he would be left sticking out like a projected radius, unsheltered and reeling across the empty lunes of his tiny sphere.
  2. Anything crescent-shaped.

Usage notesEdit

The corresponding convex shape is sometimes called a lune, but is, strictly, a lens.

Etymology 3Edit

Alteration of lyon.

NounEdit

lune (plural lunes)

  1. (hawking) A leash for a hawk.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xvj, in Le Morte Darthur, book VI:
      And thenne was he ware of a Faucon came fleynge ouer his hede toward an hyghe elme / and longe lunys aboute her feet / and she flewe vnto the elme to take her perche / the lunys ouer cast aboute a bough / And whanne she wold haue taken her flyghte / she henge by the legges fast / and syre launcelot sawe how he henge

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /luːnə/, [ˈluːnə]

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German lūne (lunar phase, caprice), from Latin lūna. Cognate with German Laune.

NounEdit

lune n (singular definite lunet, plural indefinite luner)

  1. mood
  2. whim, caprice
  3. humor, humour
InflectionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse lugna (to calm).

VerbEdit

lune (imperative lun, infinitive at lune, present tense luner, past tense lunede, perfect tense er/har lunet)

  1. warm

Etymology 3Edit

See lun (warm).

AdjectiveEdit

lune

  1. inflection of lun:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lune, from Latin lūna, from Old Latin losna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lowksneh₂, from Proto-Indo-European *lewk-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lyn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

lune f (plural lunes)

  1. The Moon.
  2. Any natural satellite of a planet.
  3. (literary) A month, particularly a lunar month.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lūna.

NounEdit

lune f (plural lunis)

  1. moon

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lune f

  1. plural of luna

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lune (moon), from Latin lūna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lune (uncountable)

  1. (astronomy, sometimes capitalised) The celestial body closest to the Earth, considered to be a planet in the Ptolemic system as well as the boundary between the Earth and the heavens.
  2. (rare, sometimes capitalised) A white, precious metal; silver.
    • 1395, Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, "Canon Yeoman's Prologue and Tale".
      He vnderstood, and brymstoon by his brother, That out of Sol and Luna were ydrawe.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lune

  1. definite singular/plural of lun

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lune

  1. definite singular/plural of lun

NovialEdit

NounEdit

lune c (plural lunes)

  1. moon

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lūna.

NounEdit

lune f (nominative singular lune)

  1. the Moon

DescendantsEdit


TarantinoEdit

NounEdit

lune

  1. moon

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lune, from Latin lūna.

NounEdit

lune f

  1. moon