English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin lūna (moon; month; crescent).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna (plural lunas)

  1. (entomology) A luna moth: a member of species Actias luna.
    • 1944, Elizabeth Enright, Then There Were Five[1], Farrar & Rinehart, page 80:
      “Gee,” whispered Oliver. He sat there staring. “A luna! I never thought I’d see a real luna!”
    • 1969, Sterling North, “An Introduction to Butterflies and Moths”, in Boys’ Life, May 1969 issue, Boy Scouts of America, page 64:
      On the previous evening we had discovered with delight a luna with the fabulous moons, one on each pale green wing.
    • 2010, Sally Roth (contributor), in Judy Pray (compiler), Garden Wisdom & Know-How: Everything You Need to Know to Plant, Grow, and Harvest, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc., →ISBN, page 348:
      Spray BT on your young oak to protect against gypsy moths, and you wipe out future lunas, cecropias, and everything else on the leaves, along with the pests.
  2. (Christianity, chiefly Catholicism and Anglicanism) A lunette: a crescent-shaped receptacle, often glass, for holding the (consecrated) host (the bread of communion) upright when exposed in the monstrance. [from 19th c.][1]
    • 1907 May, “Dominicanus”, “The Rosary and the Blessed Sacrament”, in the Dominican Friars, The Rosary Magazine, Volume 30, Number 5, page 494:
      The Bread of Angels is first taken from the tabernacle, where it rests in the luna, and placed upon the altar, covered with a corporal. After genuflecting, the priest puts the luna containing the Blessed Sacrament on its throne—the monstrance—and elevates it []
    • 1917, John F. Sullivan, The Externals of the Catholic Church, BiblioLife, LLC, published 2009, →ISBN, pages 115–116:
      This receptacle is called a “luna” or “lunula” (a moon, or a little moon), and has glass on either side, so that the Host may be seen when enclosed therein. [] [] ¶ The ciborium, the pyx and luna of the ostensorium are blessed with a simpler formula than that used for the chalice, and [] [] ¶ The chalice, the paten, the luna and the pyx are sacred things, true sacramentals, and are worthy of deepest reverence; for []
    • 2007, John Trigilio, Kenneth Brighenti, The Catholicism Answer Book: The 300 Most Frequently Asked Questions, Sourcebooks, Inc., →ISBN, page 156:
      The luna, which is a piece of glass in the shape of a moon, contains the Blessed Sacrament, previously consecrated. The luna is then placed in the middle of the sunburst of the monstrance.
Synonyms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Hawaiian luna (leader; supervisor).[2]

Noun edit

luna (plural luna or lunas)

  1. (Hawaii) A foreman on a plantation.
    • 1922 June, U. G. Murphy, “The Japanese Problem in Hawaii: How the Task of Christianizing and Americanizing the Oriental is Progressing”, in The Friend, volume 91, number 6, page 130:
      There are several reasons why the Hawaiian-born Japanese boys and girls do not take kindly to plantation labor, but one of the chief reasons is the objection to the kind of lunas who oversee the work of the laborers.
    • 1959, James Michener, Hawaii[2], Fawcett Crest, published 1986, →ISBN, page 737:
      [] haoles could not visualize Chinese or Japanese in positions of authority. And from sad experience, the great plantation owners had discovered that the Americans they could get to serve as lunas were positively no good. Capable Americans expected office jobs and incapable ones were unable to control the Oriental []
    • 2000, Sally Engle Merry, Colonizing Hawai'i: the cultural power of law, page 321:
      After the day was over I went to the luna to count my day but he would not. Then I went to him the second time and he said he would not put it down.
    • 2012, Julia Flynn Siler, Lost Kingdom, Grove Press, page 35:
      Capital punishment was outlawed by the government but some plantation managers and luna still delivered lashings and other forms of abuse.
Usage notes edit
  • This noun, though inflected as an English word (singular luna, plural lunas), is frequently italicized as a loanword.

References edit

  1. ^ luna” in Don S. Armentrout and Robert Boak Slocum (editors), An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church: A User-Friendly Reference for Episcopalians, Church Publishing, Inc. (2000), →ISBN.
  2. ^ 1986, Mary Kawena Pukui, Samuel H. Elbert, Hawaiian dictionary: Hawaiian-English, English-Hawaiian, revised and enlarged edition (University of Hawaii Press)

Anagrams edit

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Noun edit

luna f (plural lunas)

  1. moon

References edit

Cebuano edit

Etymology edit

cf. Malay duma

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: lu‧nâ

Noun edit

luna

  1. one's proper place under the sun
    Balik sa imong luna aron walay gubot.
    Return to your proper place to avoid trouble.
  2. room, accommodation
    May luna pa ba ko sa kinabuhi mo?
    Is there still room for me in your life?

Verb edit

luna

  1. pahi~ - to put things in order
    Palad ang mipahiluna nga magkita sila.
    It was arranged by fate that they meet.

Chavacano edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish luna (moon).

Noun edit

luna

  1. moon

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Noun edit

luna f

  1. moon

References edit

  • luna” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech luna, from Proto-Slavic *lunà, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *láukšnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂. Cognates include Latin lūna, Ancient Greek λύχνος (lúkhnos), Old Prussian lauxnos and Middle Irish luan.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f

  1. (poetic) moon
    Synonym: měsíc

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • luna in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • luna in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • luna in Internetová jazyková příručka

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From luno (moon) +‎ -a.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

luna (accusative singular lunan, plural lunaj, accusative plural lunajn)

  1. (astronomy) lunar

Fala edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese lũa, from Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f (plural lunas)

  1. moon

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[3], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

Franco-Provençal edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Noun edit

luna f

  1. moon

Interlingua edit

Noun edit

luna (plural lunas)

  1. moon

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

From Luna, from Latin lūna, from Old Latin losna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂, derived from the root *lewk- (bright). Cognates include Armenian լուսին (lusin), Spanish luna, Portuguese lua, Romanian lună, Russian луна́ (luná).

 
 

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f (plural lune)

  1. (colloquial, astronomy, by extension of Luna) a natural satellite
    Synonym: satellite naturale
  2. (archaic, literary) a month, moon
    • 1314, Dante Alighieri, “Canto XXXIII”, in Inferno[4], lines 22, 25–27; republished as Giorgio Petrocchi, editor, La Commedia secondo l'antica vulgata[5], 2nd revised edition, Florence: Casa Editrice Le Lettere, 1994:
      Breve pertugio dentro da la Muda,
      []
      m’avea mostrato per lo suo forame
      più lune già, quand’io feci ’l mal sonno
      che del futuro mi squarciò ’l velame
      "A narrow opening in the mew had already shown me many moons through its hole, when I dreamed the evil dream that tore apart the veil of the future for me."
  3. (archaic, figurative, by extension) a time of the year
  4. (alchemy) silver
  5. (heraldry) a full moon (as opposed to a crescent)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Ladino edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Noun edit

luna f (Latin spelling, plural lunas)

  1. moon

References edit

  • Joseph Nehama, Jesús Cantera (1977) Dictionnaire du Judéo-Espagnol (in French), Madrid: CSIC, →ISBN, page 332

Latin edit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
 
lūna (the Moon)

Alternative forms edit

  • Lūna (for the sense "the Moon" and the goddess)

Etymology edit

From Old Latin losna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂, which is derived from Proto-Indo-European *lewk-.

Cognates include Old Church Slavonic лꙋна (luna).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lūna f (genitive lūnae); first declension

  1. (astronomy) a moon
  2. (figuratively) moonlight, moon shine
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 2.697:
      lūna fuit: spectant iuvenem gladiōsque recondunt
      There was moonlight: They look upon the young man, and sheathe their swords
  3. (figuratively) a month
  4. (figuratively) a night
  5. a crescent shape
  6. (alchemy, chemistry) silver

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lūna lūnae
Genitive lūnae lūnārum
Dative lūnae lūnīs
Accusative lūnam lūnās
Ablative lūnā lūnīs
Vocative lūna lūnae

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Balkan-Romance:
    • Aromanian: lunã
    • Istro-Romanian: lurĕ
    • Romanian: lună
  • Southern Romance:
  • Gallo-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Navarro-Aragonese:
    • Old Leonese:
    • Old Galician-Portuguese: lũa
      • Galician: lúa, Lúa
      • Portuguese: lua, Lua (see there for further descendants)
    • Old Spanish:
      • Spanish: luna (see there for further descendants)
      • Ladino: luna
  • Italo-Romance:
  • Dalmatian: loina
  • Non-Romance:

See also edit

References edit

  • luna”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • luna”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • luna in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[6], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the sun, moon, is eclipsed: sol (luna) deficit, obscuratur
    • the moon waxes, wanes: luna crescit; decrescit, senescit
  • luna”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • luna”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • luna”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • luna”, in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Lindu edit

Noun edit

luna

  1. pillow

Middle English edit

Noun edit

luna (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of lune

References edit

Neapolitan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin lūna.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈluna/
    • (Naples) IPA(key): [ˈluːnɐ]
    • (Central Apulia) IPA(key): [ˈluːnə ⁓ ˈlownə ⁓ ˈləʉnə]
    • (Eastern Abruzzo) IPA(key): [ˈluːnə ⁓ ˈlownə ⁓ ˈlʊːnə] IPA(key): [ˈlyːnə ⁓ ˈliːnə]

Noun edit

luna f (plural lune)

  1. moon

References edit

  • AIS: Sprach- und Sachatlas Italiens und der Südschweiz [Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Italy and Southern Switzerland] – map 361: “la luna” – on navigais-web.pd.istc.cnr.it

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan luna, from Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f (plural lunas)

  1. moon

Old Czech edit

Alternative forms edit

  • łuna (alternative writing)

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *lunà, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *láukšnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f (poetic)

  1. moon
    Synonym: měsiec
  2. glow; light beam
    luna měsiečná
    moonbeam

Declension edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Papiamentu edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish luna (moon).

Noun edit

luna

  1. moon
  2. month

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin lūna. Doublet of łuna and Roksana.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luna f

  1. (archaic, poetic) moon
    Synonyms: księżyc, miesiąc

Declension edit

Related terms edit

adjectives
nouns

Further reading edit

  • luna in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlu.na/
  • Rhymes: -una
  • Hyphenation: lu‧na

Noun edit

luna

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of lună: the moon, the month

Sardinian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Noun edit

luna f (plural lunas)

  1. moon

References edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *luna, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *láukšnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lúna f (Cyrillic spelling лу́на)

  1. moon
    Synonym: mesec/misec/mjesec

Declension edit

References edit

  • luna” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Sicilian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin lūna.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈluna/
  • Hyphenation: lù‧na

Noun edit

luna f (plural luni)

  1. moon

Derived terms edit

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *lunà.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈluna]
  • Hyphenation: lu‧na

Noun edit

luna f (genitive singular luny, nominative plural luny, genitive plural lún, declension pattern of žena)

  1. (archaic, poetic) moon
    Synonym: mesiac

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • luna”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *lunà, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *láukšnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lúna f

  1. moon

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Feminine, a-stem
nom. sing. lúna
gen. sing. lúne
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
lúna lúni lúne
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
lúne lún lún
dative
(dajȃlnik)
lúni lúnama lúnam
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
lúno lúni lúne
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
lúni lúnah lúnah
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
lúno lúnama lúnami

Synonyms edit

See also edit

Spanish edit

 
 

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin lūna, from Proto-Italic *louksnā, from Proto-Indo-European *lówksneh₂, which is derived from Proto-Indo-European *lewk-. Cognate with Galician lúa, Portuguese lua, Catalan lluna, French lune, Italian luna, Occitan luna and Romanian lună.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈluna/ [ˈlu.na]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -una
  • Syllabification: lu‧na

Noun edit

luna f (plural lunas)

  1. moon

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit