See also: Mone, móne, mõne, and møne

English

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English mone, imone, from Old English gemāna (community, company, society, common property, communion, companionship, intercourse, cohabitation), from Proto-Germanic *gamainô (community), from Proto-Indo-European *moini- (common, collective).

Noun

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mone (countable and uncountable, plural mones)

  1. (obsolete) Communion; participation; companionship.
  2. (obsolete) Sexual intercourse.
  3. (archaic) A companion.

Etymology 2

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From Middle English monien, from Old English monian, manian (to bring to mind what ought to be done, urge upon one what ought to be done, admonish, warn, exhort, instigate, bring to mind what should not be forgotten, remind, suggest, prompt, tell what ought to be done, teach, instruct, advise, claim, demand, ask of a person, remember), from Proto-Germanic *manōną (to admonish), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think). Cognate with Saterland Frisian mania (to admonish), Dutch manen (to admonish), German mahnen (to remind, admonish, urge).

Verb

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mone (third-person singular simple present mones, present participle moning, simple past and past participle moned)

  1. (transitive) To admonish; advise; explain.

Etymology 3

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From Middle English mone, alteration (affected by monien (to admonish)) of *mine (mind), from Middle English minen, mynen, munen, from Old English ġemynan, ġemunan (to remember). More at mind.

Noun

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mone (plural mones)

  1. Mind; preference.
    • 1593, Michael Drayton, “The Second Eglog”, in Idea the Shepheards Garland, [], London: [] [T. Orwin] for Thomas Woodcocke, [], →OCLC; republished as J[ohn] P[ayne] C[ollier], editor, Idea the Shepheards Garland, [London: Privately printed], 1870, →OCLC, page 6:
      A cumber-world, yet in the world am left, / A fruitles plot, with brambles ouergrowne, / Miſliued man of my vvorlds ioy bereft, / Hart-breaking cares the ofspring of my mone.

Anagrams

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Bavarian

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Etymology

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From Middle High German māne, from Old High German māno. Cognate with German Mond, English moon, Icelandic máni, Gothic 𐌼𐌴𐌽𐌰 (mēna).

Noun

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mone

  1. (Sappada, Sauris) moon

References

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Italian

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.ne/
  • Rhymes: -ɔne
  • Hyphenation: mò‧ne

Noun

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mone

  1. plural of mona (monkey)

Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈmo.ne/
  • Rhymes: -one
  • Hyphenation: mó‧ne

Noun

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mone

  1. plural of mona (vagina)

Latin

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Verb

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monē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of moneō

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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From Old English mān, from Proto-West Germanic *mainu, from Proto-Germanic *mainō.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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mone

  1. A lamentation
  2. A moan, complaint
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • English: moan
  • Scots: mane
  • Yola: moan

Etymology 2

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From Old English mōna. The sense of the word as silver is the result of its astrological association with the planet.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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mone (plural mones or monen)

  1. (astronomy) The celestial body closest to the Earth, considered to be a planet in the Ptolemic system as well as the boundary between the Earth and the heavens; the Moon.
  2. (rare) A white, precious metal; silver.
    • 1500, Singer, Catalogue of Latin and Vernacular Alchemical Manuscripts in Great Britain in Ireland:
      Tak j quarter oz of the sone and di. of the mone purgyd, And mak of both thes sotyl powder lymal.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Descendants
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References
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Etymology 3

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From Old Norse munu, from Proto-Germanic *munaną. Doublet of monen (to remember).

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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mone (chiefly Northern, auxiliary)

  1. Expresses futurity: shall, will
  2. Expresses obligation: must, ought to
  3. Expresses ability: can, be able to
Conjugation
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Descendants
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References
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Etymology 4

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Verb

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mone

  1. Alternative form of monen (to remember)

Etymology 5

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Verb

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mone

  1. Alternative form of monen (to lament)

Etymology 6

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Noun

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mone

  1. Alternative form of moneye

Volapük

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Noun

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mone

  1. dative singular of mon