See also: Dim, dim., dím, and dìm

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

dim

  1. (mathematics) dimension

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dim, dym, from Old English dim, dimm (dim, dark, gloomy; wretched, grievous, sad, unhappy), from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz (dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰem- (to whisk, smoke, blow; dust, haze, cloud; obscure). Compare Faroese dimmur, Icelandic dimmur (dark) and dimma (darkness).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: dĭm, IPA(key): /dɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

AdjectiveEdit

dim (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)

  1. Not bright or colorful.
    The lighting was too dim for me to make out his facial features.
    • 1821, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Adonais
      that sustaining Love / Which, through the web of being blindly wove / By man and beast and earth and air and sea, / Burns bright or dim
  2. (colloquial) Not smart or intelligent.
    He may be a bit dim, but he's not stupid.
  3. Indistinct, hazy or unclear.
    His vision grew dimmer as he aged.
  4. Disapproving, unfavorable: rarely used outside the phrase take a dim view of.
  5. (music) Clipping of diminished.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

dim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Dimness.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 278:
      All about me the Red Weed clambered among the ruins, writhing to get above me in the dim. Night, the Mother of Fear and Mystery, was coming upon me.

VerbEdit

dim (third-person singular simple present dims, present participle dimming, simple past and past participle dimmed)

  1. (transitive) To make something less bright.
    He dimmed the lights and put on soft music.
  2. (intransitive) To become darker.
    The lights dimmed briefly when the air conditioning was turned on.
  3. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct
  4. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
    • 1740, Christopher Pitt, The Aeneid
      Her starry eyes were dimm'd with streaming tears.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdɪm]
  • Hyphenation: dim

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch duim.

NounEdit

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. thumb
  2. inch
    Synonym: inci

Etymology 2Edit

From English dimmer.

NounEdit

dim (first-person possessive dimku, second-person possessive dimmu, third-person possessive dimnya)

  1. high-beam headlamp on a road vehicle.

Further readingEdit


LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

dim

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of dimēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of dimēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of dimēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of dimēt

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dimmr. Related to English dim and Icelandic dimmur.

AdjectiveEdit

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmere, indefinite superlative dimmest, definite superlative dimmeste)

  1. dim
  2. to have bad vision
    Han er dim på synet
    His vision is dim/bad/poor

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the Old Norse adjective dimmr, from Proto-Germanic *dimmaz. The neuter noun is derived from the adjective. The automotive senses may be a Back-formation from - of the verb dimme.

AdjectiveEdit

dim (neuter singular dimt, definite singular and plural dimme, comparative dimmare, indefinite superlative dimmast, definite superlative dimmaste)

  1. gloomy
  2. dim
  3. having bad vision
    Han er dim på synet
    His vision is dim/bad/poor
Related termsEdit

Noun 1Edit

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (automotive, colloquial) a switching of one's headlamps from high-beam to low-beam
  2. (automotive, colloquial) lever, button or other
  3. (dialectal) Clipping of dimme (twilight, half darkness).

Noun 2Edit

dim n (definite singular dimmet, uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) dimmest, darkest part of the summer night
  2. (dialectal) twilight
    Synonym: skumring

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

dim m (definite singular dimmen, indefinite plural dimmar, definite plural dimmane)

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of dimensjon.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dȉm m (Cyrillic spelling ди̏м)

  1. smoke

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dymъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dȉm m inan

  1. smoke

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative dìm
genitive díma
singular
nominative dìm
accusative dìm
genitive díma
dative dímu
locative dímu
instrumental dímom

Further readingEdit

  • dim”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

SumerianEdit

RomanizationEdit

dim

  1. Romanization of 𒁴 (dim)

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh dim. Cognate with the rare Old Irish dim (something, anything), which may be a Brythonic loanword. Further etymology uncertain. Matasović takes it from Proto-Celtic *dis-smi-, dissimilated from Proto-Indo-European *dus-smi- (literally bad one).[1] Morris Jones hypothesizes the original meaning was share, portion and derives it from Proto-Celtic *dīsman, from Proto-Indo-European *deh₂y- (to share).[2]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dim

  1. any
  2. no, not, none

NounEdit

dim m (uncountable)

  1. anything
  2. nothing, none, nil, zero

ParticleEdit

dim

  1. not

Usage notesEdit

As a verbal particle, almost always appears mutated as ddim.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dim ddim nim unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), chapter DIM, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 100
  2. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 315