French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French mi (middle), from Old French mi, mie (middle), from earlier *miei (compare lit, liet < *lieit), from Latin medius (adjective), medium (noun).

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. half, mid-
    à mi-cheminhalfway
    à mi-voixin a low voice (literally, “in a half-voice”)
    mi-amerbittersweet

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

mi-

  1. Rōmaji transcription of

Kambera edit

Pronoun edit

mi-

  1. second person plural nominative proclitic

See also edit

Lakota edit

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. my; first person singular possessive marker, used with some kinship terms and some words for body parts

Synonyms edit

Phuthi edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *gɪ́-mɪ̀-.

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. Class 4 noun prefix.

Swahili edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *mɪ̀-.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Prefix edit

mi- (singular m-)

  1. mi class(IV) noun prefix and adjective agreement prefix, denoting plurals of m class(III)
    miti mirefutall trees
    mfano (example) → ‎mifano (examples)
    muhindi (maize plant) → ‎mihindi (maize plants)
    mwili (body) → ‎miili (bodies)

Usage notes edit

If an adjective starts with i, the two is are merged to one:

mi- + ‎-ingine (other) → ‎mingine

Before e, the form my- is used. This does not apply to nouns.

See also edit

Ternate edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Tehit m- (first-person plural exclusive prefix).

Pronoun edit

mi- (Jawiمي-⁩)

  1. first-person plural exclusive clitic, we
  2. first-person plural exclusive possessive pronoun, our
    Synonym: mia-
  3. (feminine) third-person singular possessive pronoun, her

See also edit

References edit

  • Frederik Sigismund Alexander de Clercq (1890) Bijdragen tot de kennis der Residentie Ternate, E.J. Brill
  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Tocharian B edit

Verb edit

mi-

  1. to hurt, harm (grievously)

Tsonga edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *gɪ́-mɪ̀-.

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. Class 4 noun prefix.

Venda edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *gɪ́-mɪ̀-.

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. Class 4 noun prefix.

West Makian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Cognate with Ternate mi- (our).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mi-

  1. first-person plural exclusive possessive prefix, our

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

mi-

  1. (animate) alternative form of ma- (his, hers, that being's) when preceded by a root-initial i

See also edit

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics

Ye'kwana edit

Pronunciation edit

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. Allomorph of m- (second-person prefix) used for stems that begin with a consonant.

Inflection edit

Zulu edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *mɪ̀-.

Prefix edit

mi-

  1. Class 4 simple noun prefix.