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See also: Mel, mél, mèl, mêl, měl, -mel-, mel', and Mel.

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of melody.

NounEdit

mel (plural mels)

  1. (psychoacoustics) A common scale of pitches that are perceived by listeners to be equally spaced from one another, or one unit on that scale.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin milium.

NounEdit

mel m (definite singular meli)

  1. millet

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal mel, from Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Compare French miel, Italian miele, Portuguese mel, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

NounEdit

mel f (plural mels)

  1. honey

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

MutationEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mel

  1. thousand

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mjǫl, from Proto-Germanic *melwą, from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, rub, break up).

NounEdit

mel n (singular definite melet, not used in plural form)

  1. flour

DhuwalEdit

NounEdit

mel

  1. eye

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mel, from Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m (plural meles)

  1. honey

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mēl

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐌻

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel

  1. honey

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognates include Ancient Greek μέλι (méli), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌸 (miliþ), and Old Armenian մեղր (mełr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel n (genitive mellis); third declension

  1. honey
  2. (figuratively) sweetness, pleasantness
    • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 3.1.5
      Sed nos veremur ne parum hic liber mellis et absinthii multum habere videatur
      But I fear that this book will have too little sweetness and too much wormwood.
  3. (figuratively, term of endearment) darling, sweet, honey
    • c. 254 BCE – 184 BCE, Plautus, Bacchides 18
      cor meum spes mea / mel meum suavitudo cibus gaudium
      My heart, my hope, my honey, sweetness, food delight.

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mel mella
genitive mellis mellium
mellum
dative mellī mellibus
accusative mel mella
ablative melle mellibus
vocative mel mella
  • Note that the ablative singular melle has the alternative form melli.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mel in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mel in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mel” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • somebody's darling: mel ac deliciae alicuius (Fam. 8. 8. 1)

LojbanEdit

PronunciationEdit

RafsiEdit

mel (or alternate rafsi mle )

  1. rafsi of melbi (beautiful).

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mjǫl

NounEdit

mel n (definite singular melet)

  1. flour

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

mel

  1. present tense of mala

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: mel
  • Portuguese: mel

PortugueseEdit

 mel on Portuguese Wikipedia
 
mel

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mel (honey), from Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey). Compare Catalan mel, French miel, Italian miele, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m (plural meles or méis)

  1. honey

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:mel.

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m (plural mels)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) honey
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun) jam

SynonymsEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French mer (sea), with the 'r' turned into 'l'.

NounEdit

mel (plural mels)

  1. sea

DeclensionEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse merðr, merð, whence also Norwegian merd, Finnish merta and Swedish mjärde.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel n (definite singular mele)

  1. (fishing) part of the fish trap, wherein the fish are trapped
  2. sound, strait

Derived termsEdit

  • melbann (the band that causes the constriction)