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See also: Mel, mél, mèl, mêl, měl, -mel-, mel', and Mel.

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening of melody.

NounEdit

mel (plural mels)

  1. (psychoacoustics) A common scale of pitches that are perceived by listeners to be equally spaced from one another, or one unit on that scale.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin milium.

NounEdit

mel m (definite singular meli)

  1. millet

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan mel, from Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Compare French miel, Italian miele, Portuguese mel, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel f (plural mels)

  1. honey

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

MutationEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mel

  1. thousand

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mjǫl, from Proto-Germanic *melwą, from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, rub, break up).

NounEdit

mel n (singular definite melet, not used in plural form)

  1. flour

DhuwalEdit

NounEdit

mel

  1. eye

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mel, from Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m (plural meles)

  1. honey

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mēl

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐌻

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel

  1. honey

LatinEdit

  A user suggests that this Latin entry be cleaned up, giving the reason: "for the Plautus quote as it lacks to many information regarding the edition (editor, year, place?)".
Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognates include Ancient Greek μέλι (méli), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌸 (miliþ), and Old Armenian մեղր (mełr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel n (genitive mellis); third declension

  1. honey
    • c. 189 BCE, Plautus, Truculentus 2.4.20:
      hoc est melle dulci dulcius
      This is honey sweeter than sweet honey.
      (Can we verify this quotation?)
  2. (figuratively) sweetness, pleasantness
    • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 3.1.5:
      Sed nos veremur ne parum hic liber mellis et absinthii multum habere videatur
      But I fear that this book will have too little sweetness and too much wormwood.
  3. (figuratively, term of endearment) darling, sweet, honey
    • c. 190 BCE, Plautus, Bacchides 18:
      cor meum spes mea / mel meum suavitudo cibus gaudium
      My heart, my hope, my honey, sweetness, food delight.

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mel mella
Genitive mellis mellium
mellum
Dative mellī mellibus
Accusative mel mella
Ablative melle mellibus
Vocative mel mella
  A user has added this entry to requests for verification(+) giving the reason: "For abl.sg. melli. L&S which is often used as a source in Wiktionary has: "abl. sing. melli, Plaut. Truc. 2, 4, 20." Wiktionary however gives the locus with melle, see above.
(Additionally there might be some WT stuff about Latin and Old Latin being two different languages, in which case Plautus can't attest anything Latin.)"
If it cannot be verified that this term meets our attestation criteria, it will be deleted. Feel free to edit this entry as normal, but do not remove {{rfv}} until the request has been resolved.
  • Note that the ablative singular melle has the alternative form melli.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English mǣl, from Proto-Germanic *mēlą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel (plural mels)

  1. A time, occasion or event.
  2. The occasion when a meal is consumed; mealtime.
  3. A meal or feast.

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mjǫl

NounEdit

mel n (definite singular melet)

  1. flour, meal

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

mel

  1. present of mala

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m

  1. honey

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 mel on Portuguese Wikipedia
 
mel

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mel (honey), from Latin mel (honey), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid (honey). Compare Catalan mel, French miel, Italian miele, Romanian miere, Spanish miel.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mel m (plural meles or méis)

  1. honey

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:mel.

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel (honey).

NounEdit

mel m (plural mels)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) honey
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun) jam

SynonymsEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French mer (sea), with the 'r' turned into 'l'.

NounEdit

mel (plural mels)

  1. sea

DeclensionEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

VerbEdit

mel

  1. Alternative spelling of meel

NounEdit

mel

  1. Alternative spelling of meel