English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Shortening of melody.

Noun edit

mel (plural mels)

  1. (psychoacoustics) A unit of pitch on a scale of pitches perceived by listeners to be equally spaced from one another.

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin mel (honey).

Noun edit

mel (uncountable)

  1. Honey, when used as an ingredient in cosmetic products.

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin milium.

Noun edit

mel m (definite meli)

  1. millet

Breton edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mel m

  1. honey

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *melem m or f, from Latin mel n.

Noun edit

mel f (plural mels)

  1. honey
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Late Latin mēlum, variant of mālum (apple).

Noun edit

mel m (plural mels)

  1. (Balearics, anatomy) cheekbone
    Synonym: pòmul

Etymology 3 edit

Pronoun edit

mel

  1. (archaic) Contraction of me el. (in medieval Catalan, nowadays written as me'l)

Further reading edit

Classical Nahuatl edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mēl inan

  1. second-person singular possessive singular of ēlli; (it is) your liver.

Cornish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Brythonic *mel, from Proto-Celtic *meli (honey) (compare Welsh mêl, Old Irish mil), from Proto-Indo-European *mélid, whence also Latin mel (honey).

Noun edit

mel m

  1. honey

Mutation edit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mel

  1. second-person singular imperative of mlít

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mīlle.

Numeral edit

mel

  1. thousand

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse mjǫl, from Proto-Germanic *melwą, from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, rub, break up).

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun edit

mel n (singular definite melet, not used in plural form)

  1. flour

Declension edit

Further reading edit

Dhuwal edit

Noun edit

mel

  1. eye

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese mel, from Vulgar Latin *melem m or f, from Latin mel n.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mel m (plural meles)

  1. honey

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • mel” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • mel” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • mel” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • mel” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mel” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

mēl

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐌻

Istriot edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin *melem m or f, from Latin mel n.

Noun edit

mel

  1. honey

References edit

  • AIS: Sprach- und Sachatlas Italiens und der Südschweiz [Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Italy and Southern Switzerland] – map 1159: “il miele” – on navigais-web.pd.istc.cnr.it

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *meli, from Proto-Indo-European *mélit (*mel-it), with the athematic suffix *-it that indicates comestible substances (compare IE *sép-it «wheat»). Cognate with Ancient Greek μέλι (méli), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌸 (miliþ), Old Armenian մեղր (mełr), Hittite milit and Luvic mallit-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mel n (genitive mellis); third declension

  1. honey
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 3.743-744:
      colligit errantēs et in arbore claudit inānī
      Liber et inventī praemia mellis habet.
      Liber gathers the wandering [bees] and confines them in a hollow tree,
      and he has the rewards of discovering honey.

      (See Liber – the Greek Dionysus or Roman Bacchus – and The Discovery of Honey by Bacchus.)
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Matthew 3:4:
      [...] esca autem eius erat lucustae et mel silvestre.
      And his food was locusts and wild honey.
    • c. 189 BCE, Plautus, Truculentus 371, (ed. by Friedric Leo, Plauti Comoediae vol. 2, 1896, Berlin: Weidmann):
      Heia, hoc est melle dulci dulcius.
      Ah! This is sweeter than sweet honey.
  2. (figuratively) sweetness, pleasantness
    • c. 35 CE – 100 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 3.1.5:
      Sed nos veremur ne parum hic liber mellis et absinthii multum habere videatur
      But I fear that this book will have too little sweetness and too much wormwood.
  3. (figuratively, term of endearment) darling, sweet, honey
    • c. 190 BCE, Plautus, Bacchides 18:
      cor meum, spes mea / mel meum, suavitudo, cibus, gaudium
      My heart, my hope, my honey, sweetness, food, delight.

Declension edit

Third-declension noun (neuter, i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mel mella
Genitive mellis mellium
mellum
Dative mellī mellibus
Accusative mel mella
Ablative melle
mellī
mellibus
Vocative mel mella

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Vulgar Latin: *melem m or f (see there for further descendants)

References edit

  • mel”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mel”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mel in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • somebody's darling: mel ac deliciae alicuius (Fam. 8. 8. 1)

Malay edit

Etymology edit

From English mail.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mél (Jawi spellingميل⁩, plural mel-mel, informal 1st possessive melku, 2nd possessive melmu, 3rd possessive melnya)

  1. (uncommon, mostly in compounds) mail
    Synonyms: pos, surat

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English mǣl, from Proto-West Germanic *māl, from Proto-Germanic *mēlą.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mel (plural meles)

  1. A time, occasion or event.
  2. The occasion when a meal is consumed; mealtime.
  3. A meal or feast.

Descendants edit

References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Danish mel, from Old Norse mjǫl.

Noun edit

mel n (definite singular melet)

  1. flour, meal

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

mel

  1. present of mala

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mel, from Vulgar Latin *melem m or f, from Latin mel n.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mel m

  1. honey

Descendants edit

Old Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Brythonic *mel, from Proto-Celtic *meli, from Proto-Indo-European *mélit.

Noun edit

mel m

  1. honey

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

 mel on Portuguese Wikipedia
 
mel

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese mel, from Vulgar Latin *melem m or f, from Latin mel n.

Compare Galician mel m, Spanish miel f.

Pronunciation edit

 

Noun edit

mel m (plural méis or meles)

  1. honey

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:mel.

Derived terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English mel.

Noun edit

mel m (plural meli)

  1. mel

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin *melem m, from Latin mel n.

Noun edit

mel m (plural mels)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) honey
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun) jam

Synonyms edit

References edit

  • AIS: Sprach- und Sachatlas Italiens und der Südschweiz [Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Italy and Southern Switzerland] – map 1159: “il miele” – on navigais-web.pd.istc.cnr.it

Volapük edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French mer (sea), with the 'r' turned into 'l'.

Noun edit

mel (nominative plural mels)

  1. sea

Declension edit