See also: Passus

English edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

passus (plural passuses)

  1. A section of a long narrative poem; a canto

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Perfect passive participle of pandō (I spread out [to dry]).

Participle edit

passus (feminine passa, neuter passum); first/second-declension participle

  1. spread out
  2. dried
    ūva passaraisin
Declension edit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative passus passa passum passī passae passa
Genitive passī passae passī passōrum passārum passōrum
Dative passō passō passīs
Accusative passum passam passum passōs passās passa
Ablative passō passā passō passīs
Vocative passe passa passum passī passae passa
Descendants edit
  • Galician: pasa, paso
  • Portuguese: passa
  • Spanish: paso

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Italic *pat-s-tus, from Proto-Indo-European *peth₂- (to spread). Equivalent to pandō +‎ -tus.

Noun edit

passus m (genitive passūs); fourth declension

  1. step
  2. pace
  3. pace: a Roman unit of length equal to five Roman feet
Declension edit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative passus passūs
Genitive passūs passuum
passum
Dative passuī passibus
Accusative passum passūs
Ablative passū passibus
Vocative passus passūs
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 3 edit

Perfect active participle of patior.

Participle edit

passus (feminine passa, neuter passum); first/second-declension participle

  1. suffered, having suffered, experienced, undergone
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 1.199:
      “Ō, passī graviōra! Dabit deus hīs quoque fīnem.”
      “Oh, [you who] have suffered heavier [woes]! God will grant an end to this, too.”
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 1.487–488:
      nec tamen ut prīmus maerē mala tālia passus;
      obruit ingentēs ista procella virōs
      Mourn not as though thou wert the first that had suffered such ills;
      the same storm has borne down many a mighty man.

      1851. The Fasti &c of Ovid. Translated by H. T. Riley. London: H. G. Bohn. pg. 31.
  2. allowed, having allowed
  3. permitted, having permitted
Declension edit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative passus passa passum passī passae passa
Genitive passī passae passī passōrum passārum passōrum
Dative passō passō passīs
Accusative passum passam passum passōs passās passa
Ablative passō passā passō passīs
Vocative passe passa passum passī passae passa
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • 1. passus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • 2. passus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • passus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • passus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • passus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a mile away: a mille passibus
    • with dishevelled hair: passis crinibus
  • passus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • passus in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • passus”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin passus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpas.sus/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -assus
  • Syllabification: pas‧sus

Noun edit

passus m inan

  1. (literary) passage (section of text)
    Synonyms: akapit, fragment, ustęp

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • passus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • passus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin passus (step).

Noun edit

passus c

  1. A short section (e.g. a few connected words or sentences) of a written or oral presentation; a "passage" (in a book, etc.); an "item" (of a presentation)
  2. A short elaboration on an item of a presentation not belonging to the main subject

Inflection edit

Declension of passus 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative passus passusen passusar passusarna
Genitive passus passusens passusars passusarnas

References edit

Anagrams edit