See also: Pace, PACE, pacé, pacę, pače, páce, and páče

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pase, from Anglo-Norman pas, Old French pas, and their source, Latin passus. Doublet of pas, Doublet of fathom; cf. also pass. Cognate with Spanish pasear.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /peɪs/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

NounEdit

pace (plural paces)

  1. Step.
    1. A step taken with the foot. [from 14th c.]
    2. The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.[1] [from 14th c.]
      Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor.
      I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces.
  2. Way of stepping.
    1. A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet. [from 14th c.]
      • 2012 June 9, Owen Phillips, “Euro 2012: Netherlands 0-1 Denmark”, in BBC Sport[1]:
        Netherlands, one of the pre-tournament favourites, combined their undoubted guile, creativity, pace and attacking quality with midfield grit and organisation.
    2. Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait. [from 15th c.]
  3. Speed or velocity in general. [from 15th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book II, canto IX, stanza 14, page 311:
      For with ſuch puiſſance and impetuous maine / Thoſe Champions broke on them, that forſt the fly, / Like ſcattered Sheepe, whenas the Shepherds ſwaine / A Lyon and a Tigre doth eſpye, / With greedy pace forth ruſhing from the foreſt nye.
    • 1983, Kathryn Lance, Running for Health, Bantam, →ISBN:
      The fastest women runners can run a mile in well under five minutes, but in order to reach that goal they've had to train at a much slower pace over thousands of miles.
  4. (cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing. [from 19th c.]
  5. (collective) A group of donkeys.
    • 1952, G. B. Stern, The Donkey Shoe, The Macmillan Company (1952), page 29:
      [] but at Broadstairs and other places along the coast, a pace of donkeys stood on the sea-shore expectant (at least, their owners were expectant) of children clamouring to ride.
    • 2006, "Drop the dead donkeys", The Economist, 9 November 2006:
      A pace of donkeys fans out in different directions.
    • 2007, Elinor De Wire, The Lightkeepers' Menagerie: Stories of Animals at Lighthouses, Pineapple Press (2007), →ISBN, page 200:
      Like a small farm, the lighthouse compound had its chattering of chicks, pace of donkeys, troop of horses, and fold of sheep.
  6. (obsolete) Passage, route.
    1. (obsolete) One's journey or route. [14th–18th c.]
    2. (obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc. [14th–17th c.]
    3. (obsolete) An aisle in a church. [15th–19th c.]
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

pace (not comparable)

  1. (cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

VerbEdit

pace (third-person singular simple present paces, present participle pacing, simple past and past participle paced)

  1. To walk back and forth in a small distance.
  2. To set the speed in a race. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. To measure by walking.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin pāce (in peace), ablative form of pāx (peace).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

pace

  1. (formal) With all due respect to.
    • 1998: Harold Bloom, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
      She is marvelous here, but he (pace many critics) is no bumpkin
Usage notesEdit

Used when expressing a contrary opinion, in formal speech or writing.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Alteration of archaic Pasch.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /peɪs/

NounEdit

pace (plural paces)

  1. Easter.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ How Many? A Dictionary of Units of Measurement: English Customary Weights and Measures, © Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (§: Distance, ¶ № 6)

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

paco +‎ -e

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

pace

  1. peacefully

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

pace

  1. third-person singular present indicative of pacer
  2. second-person singular imperative of pacer

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pace (uncountable)

  1. peace

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pācem, accusative of pāx (peace), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pace f (plural paci)

  1. peace

AdverbEdit

pace

  1. (colloquial) peace be with you; that's it; end of the story
    pace e amenpeace be with you and amen

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pāce

  1. ablative singular of pāx

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

pace

  1. proceed; go forward
    • 1387-1410, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue
      Er that I ferther in this tale pace, / Me thynketh it acordaunt to resoun / To telle yow al the condicioun / Of ech of hem, so as it semed me, / And whiche they weren, and of what degree []

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

pace

  1. first-person singular present/imperative middle of pacati (to cook)
  2. singular optative active of pacati (to cook)

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pace m anim

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of pac

NounEdit

pace f

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of paca

NounEdit

pace f

  1. dative/locative singular of paka

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pācem, accusative of pāx (peace), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pace f (uncountable)

  1. peace

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

pace

  1. inflection of pacer:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pees, from Anglo-Norman peis, from Latin pax.

NounEdit

pace

  1. peace
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, line 19:
      t'avance pace an livertie,
      to promote peace and liberty——

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 114