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See also: Pudding

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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A pudding (starch-based dessert)
 
A milk pudding from Yee Shun Milk Company in Hong Kong

EtymologyEdit

From circa 1305, Middle English poding (kind of sausage; meat-filled animal stomach), puddyng, from Old French boudin (blood sausage, black pudding).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pudding (countable and uncountable, plural puddings)

  1. Any of various dishes, sweet or savoury, prepared by boiling or steaming, or from batter.
    • 2004, Victoria Wise, The Pressure Cooker Gourmet, page 313,
      The dishes in this chapter represent a range of multiethnic savory custards and steamed puddings, including a few surprises like a chèvre popover pudding and a bread pudding with lettuce and cheese.
    • 2004, Sarah Garland, The Complete Book of Herbs & Spices, page 199,
      Steamed and boiled puddings have formed the basic diet of country people in northern Europe for centuries. Early puddings consisted of the scoured stomach of a sheep or pig, stuffed with its own suet and offal, which has been thickened with oatmeal, and boiled in water or baked in the ashes of a fire.
  2. A type of cake or dessert cooked usually by boiling or steaming.
    • 2007, Magdaleen Van Wyk, The Complete South African Cookbook, page 265,
      Steamed puddings, a favourite for winter, are both easy to make and delicious. Served with one of the sweet sauces (recipes 497 to 506) they make a filling and satisfying end to a meal.
  3. A type of dessert that has a texture similar to custard or mousse but using some kind of starch as the thickening agent.
  4. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) Dessert; the dessert course of a meal.
    We have apple pie for pudding today.
  5. (originally) A sausage made primarily from blood.
  6. (slang) An overweight person.
  7. (slang) Entrails.
  8. (obsolete) Any food or victuals.
    • Prior
      Eat your pudding, slave, and hold your tongue.
  9. (archaic, slang) A piece of good fortune.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ C.T. Onions, ed. The Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1966), 721.
  2. ^ Robert K. Barnhart & Sol Steinmetz, eds. Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology (Bronx, NY: H. W. Wilson, 1988), 860.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English pudding.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʏ.dɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pud‧ding

NounEdit

pudding m (plural puddingen, diminutive puddinkje n)

  1. A pudding, dessert of the custard-type

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English pudding. Doublet of boudin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pudding m (plural puddings)

  1. any dish formed from putting the leftovers of a place such as a bakery together, and mixing them all into one

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

pudding m (plural puddings)

  1. pudding

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English pudding.

NounEdit

pudding c

  1. A cake or dessert prepared by boiling or steaming.
  2. Any of various savoury dishes prepared in a similar way to a sweet pudding.
  3. A type of dessert that has a texture similar to custard or mousse but using some kind of starch as the thickening agent.
  4. (slang) An attractive person; a hottie.
    Din kompis är en riktig pudding.
    Your friend is a real hottie.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of pudding 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pudding puddingen puddingar puddingarna
Genitive puddings puddingens puddingars puddingarnas