See also: Sage, saĝe, säge, and Säge

English

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /seɪd͡ʒ/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Etymology 1

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From Middle English sage, from Old French sage (11th century), from Latin *sapium, from Latin sapere (to taste, to discern, to be wise).

The noun meaning "man of profound wisdom" is recorded from circa 1300. Originally applied to the Seven Sages of Greece.

Adjective

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sage (comparative sager, superlative sagest)

  1. Wise.
  2. (obsolete) Grave; serious; solemn.
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Derived terms
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Noun

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sage (plural sages)

  1. A wise person or spiritual teacher; someone of gravity and wisdom, especially, a teacher venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave or stoic philosopher.
    • 1748, [David Hume], “Essay V. Sceptical Solution of these Doubts.”, in Philosophical Essays Concerning Human Understanding, London: [] A[ndrew] Millar, [], →OCLC, part I, page 69:
      ’Tis certain, that, while we aſpire to the magnanimous Firmneſs of the philoſophic Sage, and endeavour to confine our Pleaſures altogether within our own Minds, we may, at laſt, render our Philoſophy, like that of Epictetus and other Stoics, only a more refin’d Syſtem of Selfiſhneſs, and reaſon ourſelves out of all Virtue, as well as ſocial Enjoyment.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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See also

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Etymology 2

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Sage (sense 1) leaves

From Middle English sauge, from Middle French sauge, from Old French salje, from Latin salvia, from salvus (healthy), see safe.

Noun

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sage (usually uncountable, plural sages)

  1. The plant Salvia officinalis and savory spice produced from it; also planted for ornamental purposes.
  2. Any plant in the genus Salvia.
  3. Any of a number of plants such as sagebrush considered to be similar to Salvia officinalis, mostly because they are small shrubs and have gray foliage or are aromatic.
Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Further reading

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Etymology 3

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Borrowed from Japanese sage (sage), from Japanese 下げる (sageru, to lower). From 2channel.

Pronunciation

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  • Etymologically /sɑɡɛ/, but often /seɪdʒ/ due to its English homograph.

Interjection

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sage

  1. (4chan, Internet slang) Word used in the email field of imageboards to prevent a bump of the post. Used as an option rather than a word in some imageboard software.
    sage in all fields
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Verb

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sage (third-person singular simple present sages, present participle saging, simple past and past participle saged)

  1. (4chan, Internet slang) The act of using the word or option sage in the email field or a checkbox of an imageboard when posting a reply.
    Reminder to sage and report.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Finnish: sagettaa

Usage notes

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  • This word is specific to imageboards. The original purpose of sage is to not bump a thread if one deems another's (often OP's) own post to be of little value, but has evolved into a show of disrespect.

Anagrams

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Central Franconian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle High German sagen, from Old High German sagēn.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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sage (third-person singular present tense sät, past tense sat or sät, past participle jesat or jesät)

  1. (Ripuarian) to say; to tell

Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch saghe, from Old Dutch *saga, from Proto-West Germanic *sagā, from Proto-Germanic *sagǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sage f (plural sagen)

  1. story of heraldry and valor, a saga.

Derived terms

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Estonian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Finnic *sakëda.

Adjective

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sage (genitive sageda, partitive sagedat, comparative sagedam, superlative kõige sagedam)

  1. frequent

Declension

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Declension of sage (ÕS type 2/õpik, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative sage sagedad
accusative nom.
gen. sageda
genitive sagedate
partitive sagedat sagedaid
illative sagedasse sagedatesse
sagedaisse
inessive sagedas sagedates
sagedais
elative sagedast sagedatest
sagedaist
allative sagedale sagedatele
sagedaile
adessive sagedal sagedatel
sagedail
ablative sagedalt sagedatelt
sagedailt
translative sagedaks sagedateks
sagedaiks
terminative sagedani sagedateni
essive sagedana sagedatena
abessive sagedata sagedateta
comitative sagedaga sagedatega

French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French sage, from Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapium from the Classical Latin verb sapiō.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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sage (plural sages)

  1. (of a person) wise: prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. (of a woman) Chaste, modest, irreproachable in conduct
  3. (of a child) good, well-behaved, not naughty
    Alors, tu vas être sage pour maman dans le magasin ?
    Now, are you going to be good for mommy in the store?

Derived terms

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Noun

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sage m or f by sense (plural sages)

  1. a person who is prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. a sage (person)

Further reading

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Anagrams

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German

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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sage

  1. inflection of sagen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hausa

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /sá.ɡèː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [sə́.ɟèː]

Verb

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sagḕ (grade 4)

  1. to become stiff or paralyzed

Latin

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Adjective

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sāge

  1. vocative masculine singular of sāgus

Noun

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sage m

  1. singular vocative of sagus

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapium, from sapiō. Some forms have been altered on the basis of other words with forms in -a- and -au-.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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sage (plural sages)

  1. A sage; a person who serves as a fount of wisdom and knowledge.
Descendants
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References
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Adjective

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sage

  1. Sage, considered, well thought-out.
  2. Learned, schooled, educated; having much knowledge.
Descendants
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Middle French sauge.

Noun

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sage

  1. Alternative form of sauge

Norman

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Etymology

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From Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapium, from Latin sapiō, sapere (to taste; to discern; to be wise), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to taste).

Adjective

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sage m or f

  1. (Jersey) wise

Norwegian Bokmål

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Verb

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sage (imperative sag, present tense sager, simple past saga or saget or sagde, past participle saga or saget or sagd, present participle sagende)

  1. to saw (cut something with a saw)
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References

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Old French

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Etymology

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From Vulgar Latin *sapium (wise), semantically specialized alteration of Latin sapidus (delicious, wise). Doublet of sade (delicious), from the Latin form.

Adjective

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sage m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sage)

  1. wise (having wisdom)

Descendants

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References

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Sathmar Swabian

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Etymology

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From Old High German sagēn, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną.

Verb

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sage

  1. to say

References

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  • Claus Stephani, Volksgut der Sathmarschwaben (1985)