See also: Sage, säge, and Säge

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sage (11th century), from Vulgar Latin *sapius, from Latin sapere (to taste, to discern, to be wise), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to taste). The noun meaning "man of profound wisdom" is recorded from circa 1300. Originally applied to the Seven Sages of Greece.

AdjectiveEdit

sage (comparative sager, superlative sagest)

  1. Wise.
    • Shakespeare
      All you sage counsellors, hence!
    • Milton
      commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of sage advice, counselled the general to retreat
  2. (obsolete) grave; serious; solemn
    • Milton
      [Great bards] in sage and solemn tunes have sung.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

sage (plural sages)

  1. A wise person or spiritual teacher; a man or woman of gravity and wisdom, especially, a teacher venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave or stoic philosopher.
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral, London: Oxford University Press (1973), § 34:
      We aspire to the magnanimous firmness of the philosophic sage.
SynonymsEdit
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Related termsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

Sage leaves

From Old French sauge, from Latin salvia, from salvus (healthy), see safe.

NounEdit

sage (uncountable)

  1. The plant Salvia officinalis and savory spice produced from it; also planted for ornamental purposes.
SynonymsEdit
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External linksEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowing from Japanese 下げる (sageru) ("to lower").

PronunciationEdit

Properly /sa-ɣe/, which is the closest pronunciation of Japanese 下げ (sage), though often confusedly as /seɪdʒ/, akin to the homographic word of English origin.

InterjectionEdit

sage

  1. (Internet slang) Word used in the email field of imageboards to prevent a bump of the post. Used as an option rather than a word in some imageboard software.

VerbEdit

sage (third-person singular simple present sages, present participle saging, simple past and past participle saged)

  1. (Internet slang) The act of using the word or option sage in the email field or a checkbox of an imageboard when posting a reply

Usage notesEdit

  • This word is very specific to imageboards. The original purpose of sage is to not bump a thread if one deems their own post to be of little value, used as a sign of disapproval to someone else's contributions.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

NounEdit

sage f (plural sagen)

  1. story of heraldry and valor

EstonianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sage

  1. frequent

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapius from the Classical Latin verb sapiō.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sage (masculine and feminine, plural sages)

  1. (of a person) Prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. (of a woman) Chaste, modest, irreprochable in conduct

NounEdit

sage m, f (plural sages)

  1. A person who is prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. sage (clarification of this French definition is being sought)

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sage

  1. First-person singular present of sagen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of sagen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of sagen.
  4. Imperative singular of sagen.

HausaEdit

VerbEdit

sagḕ (form 4)

  1. to become stiff or paralyzed

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapius, from Latin sapiō, sapere (to taste, to discern, to be wise), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to taste).

AdjectiveEdit

sage (epicene, plural sages)

  1. wise

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sāge

  1. vocative masculine singular of sāgus

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *sapius from the Classical Latin verb sapiō.

AdjectiveEdit

sage m, f (plural sages)

  1. wise (having wisdom)

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 19:21