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See also: Pout and pouť

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A woman pouting

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English pouten, probably from Scandinavian (compare Norwegian pute (pillow, cushion), Swedish dial. puta (to be puffed out), Danish pude (pillow, cushion)), from Proto-Germanic *pūto (swollen) (compare English eelpout, Dutch puit, Low German puddig (inflated)), from Proto-Indo-European *bu- (to swell) (compare Sanskrit बुद्बुद (budbuda, bubble)).

VerbEdit

pout (third-person singular simple present pouts, present participle pouting, simple past and past participle pouted)

  1. (intransitive) To push out one's lips.
  2. (intransitive) To be or pretend to be ill-tempered; to sulk.
  3. (transitive) To say while pouting.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

pout (plural pouts)

  1. One's facial expression when pouting.
  2. A fit of sulking or sullenness.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English *poute, from Old English *pūte as in ǣleputa, ǣlepūte (eelpout), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bew- (to swell).

NounEdit

pout (plural pouts)

  1. (rare) Shortened name of various fishes such as the hornpout (Ameiurus nebulosus, the brown bullhead), the pouting (Trisopterus luscus) and the eelpouts (Zoarcidae).
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

pout (plural pouts)

  1. Alternative form of poult

VerbEdit

pout (third-person singular simple present pouts, present participle pouting, simple past and past participle pouted)

  1. (Scotland) To shoot poults.

AnagramsEdit