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See also: Lid, līd, łid, lið, and líð

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Old English hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą (compare Dutch lid, German Lid (eyelid), Swedish lid (gate)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlíto (post, trimmed log) (compare Old Norse hlíð (slope), Welsh clwyd (gate, hurdle), Latin clitellae (pack saddle), Lithuanian šlìtė (ladder), pã-šlitas (curved), Russian калитка (kalitka, gate), Ancient Greek ἄκλιτος (áklitos, stable), δικλίς (diklís, double-posted (doors, gates)), Yazghulami xad 'ladder', Sanskrit श्रित (śrita, standing on, lying on, being on, fixed on, situated in), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (to lean). More at lean.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lid (plural lids)

  1. The top or cover of a container.
  2. (slang) A cap or hat.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XII, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      “Yes, sir, if that was the language of love, I'll eat my hat,” said the blood relation, alluding, I took it, to the beastly straw contraption in which she does her gardening, concerning which I can only say that it is almost as foul as Uncle Tom's Sherlock Holmes deerstalker, which has frightened more crows than any other lid in Worcestershire.
  3. (slang) One ounce of cannabis.
  4. (surfing, slang, chiefly Australia) A bodyboard or bodyboarder.
  5. (slang) A motorcyclist's crash helmet.
  6. (slang) In amateur radio, an incompetent operator.
  7. Clipping of eyelid.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped ; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lid (third-person singular simple present lids, present participle lidding, simple past and past participle lidded)

  1. To put a lid on something.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lid m

  1. people

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • lid in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • lid in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hlít.

NounEdit

lid c

  1. trust

VerbEdit

lid

  1. imperative of lide

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch lit, let, leet, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *liþuz.

NounEdit

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n)

  1. member (of a group)
  2. member (extremity of a body), often used for penis.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch lit, let, from Old Dutch *lid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą.

NounEdit

lid n (plural leden, diminutive lidje n)

  1. (rare) lid, cover
Derived termsEdit

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

lid

  1. rafsi of lindi.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

lid

  1. imperative of lide

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *liþ-, whence also Old English liþ and Old Norse liðr.

NounEdit

lid ?

  1. member

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish, from Latin lītem, singular accusative of līs (strife, dispute, quarrel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lid f (plural lides)

  1. lawsuit
  2. fight

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lid

  1. imperative of lida.

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Lied.

NounEdit

lid (plural lids)

  1. song

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

NounEdit

lid

  1. Soft mutation of llid.

WestrobothnianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hlíð, from Proto-Germanic *hlīþō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lid f (definite singular lia or lida, dative lin)

  1. mountain side, wooded slope of a mountain or summit[1]

Usage notesEdit

It lies in the concept of this denomination in Westrobothnia, that the slope should be available either for cultivation or at least bear grass and healthy forest. Many villages and homes have hereof names.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “LI(D)”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 401