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See also: söt, sőt, søt, sốt, sọt, şot, soț, sót, soot, and Sot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sot, from Old English sot, sott (foolish, stupid), of obscure origin and relation. Compare Dutch zot (silly), French sot.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sot (plural sots)

  1. (archaic) stupid person; fool
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 2
      Remember / First to possess his books; for without them / He's but a sot, as I am []
    • Oldham
      In Egypt oft has seen the Sot bow down, / And reverence some deified Baboon.
  2. drunkard
    • Roscommon
      Every sign / That calls the staring sots to nasty wine.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

sot (third-person singular simple present sots, present participle sotting, simple past and past participle sotted)

  1. To drink until one becomes drunk
  2. To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
    • Dryden
      I hate to see a brave, bold fellow sotted.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *tˢjādīti, from Pre-Albanian (post-Proto-Indo-European) *ḱjeh₂ diHteí, dative-locative compound, literally ‘this day’. Same type of construction as sonte, sivjet. See ditë, which is related to the second component.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

sot

  1. today

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sot m (plural sots)

  1. pit

DalmatianEdit

FaliscanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Latin sunt.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sōt

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of esu

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French sot, from Old French soz, from Medieval Latin sottus (foolish), of uncertain origin, possibly a Semitic borrowing: Aramaic [script needed] (s(h)ote, fool), Hebrew שטן(sat, transgressor, rebel) or [script needed] (s(h)atooy, drunk), [script needed] (s(h)atyan, drunkard).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /so/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

sot (feminine singular sotte, masculine plural sots, feminine plural sottes)

  1. silly, foolish, stupid

NounEdit

sot m (plural sots, feminine sotte)

  1. imbecile, fool

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mozeson, Isaac (2000): The Word: The Dictionary That Reveals the Hebrew Source of English

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin subtus, which is derived from Latin sub. Cognate to Ladin sot, Romansch sut, suot, Venetian sóto, Italian sotto, French sous, Romanian sub, supt.

PrepositionEdit

sot

  1. under, beneath, underneath
  2. below, south of

AdverbEdit

sot

  1. down
  2. underneath
  3. below

Derived termsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin subtus.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdverbEdit

sot

  1. under, beneath
  2. below

LuxembourgishEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English sot, sott, of obscure origin.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sot (plural sottes or (Early ME) sotten)

  1. One who lacks wisdom, knowledge, or intelligence; a stupid person.
  2. A villainous or dishonest individual; a rogue or scoundrel.
  3. (derogatory) Used as a general-purpose insult.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: sot
  • Scots: sot
ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sot (plural and weak singular sotte)

  1. idiotic, unwise
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English sōt.

NounEdit

sot

  1. Alternative form of soot (soot)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sót

NounEdit

sot f or m (definite singular sota or soten, uncountable)
sot n (definite singular sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sót

NounEdit

sot f or n (definite singular sota or sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sōtą, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

NounEdit

sōt n

  1. soot.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sōt f

  1. sickness

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

NounEdit

sot n

  1. soot

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sot 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot sotet
Genitive sots sotets

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz

NounEdit

sot c

  1. (archaic) disease, sickness

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot soten soter soterna
Genitive sots sotens soters soternas

Derived termsEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

sot (nominative plural sots)

  1. a sort
  2. a kind
  3. a type

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


Zoogocho ZapotecEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish azote, from Arabic السَوْط‎(as-sawṭ, the whip).

NounEdit

sot

  1. whip
  2. whipping, beating

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 273