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See also: tantē, tànte, tant'è, and Tante

Contents

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch tante, from French tante.

NounEdit

tante (plural tantes, diminutive tannie or tantetjie)

  1. aunt

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French tante, from Old French ante, from Latin amita (paternal aunt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tantə/, [ˈtˢɛnd̥ə]

NounEdit

tante c (singular definite tanten, plural indefinite tanter)

  1. aunt

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French tante, from Middle French tante, from Old French ante, from Latin amita, from Proto-Indo-European *amma-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɑn.tə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tan‧te
  • Rhymes: -ɑntə

NounEdit

tante f (plural tantes, diminutive tantetje n)

  1. aunt (sister or sister-in-law of a parent)
    Synonym: moei
  2. (familiar) A woman, especially an older or assertive one.
    De zuster was een kranige tante.
    The nurse was a hardy dame.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ante (nominative form), from Latin amita.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tante f (plural tantes)

  1. aunt
    Ma mère et ma tante sont jumelles.
    My mother and my aunt are twins.
  2. (derogatory) homosexual (man); faggot, fag (US); poof (UK)
    T'as vu cette tante qui traversait la rue ?
    Did you see that faggot crossing the street?

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French tenter (attempt, tempt).

VerbEdit

tante

  1. to attempt
  2. to tempt

IdoEdit

AdverbEdit

tante

  1. so

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay tante, from Dutch tante.

NounEdit

tante (plural tante-tante, first-person possessive tanteku, second-person possessive tantemu, third-person possessive tantenya)

  1. aunt (a parent’s sister or sister-in-law)
  2. auntie (an elderly woman)
  3. madam

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tante

  1. Feminine plural of adjective tanto.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tante

  1. vocative masculine singular of tantus

ReferencesEdit


LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Tante (aunt), itself a borrowing from French tante (aunt). This borrowing was first mentioned in 18th-century Latvian texts.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

tante f (5th declension, masculine form: tēvocis), onkulis

  1. aunt (father's sister or mother's sister; father's brother's wife or mother's brother's wife)
    dzīvot pie tantesto live at (one's) aunt's
    tante Betsijaaunt Betsy
  2. aunt (a grown woman, in relation to a child, even if not the child's real aunt)
    Peterēna vienaudži mani jau uzrunā par tantiPeterēns (= Little Peter)'s friends called me aunt
    atbrauca inspektors un viena tante no arodbiedrības, veca meitathe inspector came with an aunt from the trade union, an old girl

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns. 1992, 2001. Latviešu etimoloģijas vārdnīca. Rīga: AVOTS. →ISBN.

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch tante.

NounEdit

tante (Jawi spelling تنتى‎, plural tante-tante, informal first-person possessive tanteku, second-person possessive tantemu, third-person possessive tantenya)

  1. (Netherlands) aunt (a parent’s sister or sister-in-law)

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ante, from Latin amita.

NounEdit

tante f (plural tantes)

  1. (Jersey) aunt

North FrisianEdit

NounEdit

tante

  1. aunt

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin amita, via Old French ante, French tante, and German Tante.

NounEdit

tante f or m (definite singular tanta or tanten, indefinite plural tanter, definite plural tantene)

  1. aunt

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin amita, via Old French ante, French tante, and German Tante.

NounEdit

tante f (definite singular tanta, indefinite plural tanter, definite plural tantene)

  1. aunt

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit