TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

ton

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Tongan.

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Variant of tun (cask), influenced by Old French tonne (ton).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʌn/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌn

NounEdit

ton (plural tons)

  1. Any of various units of mass, (historical) originally notionally equal to the contents of a tun, particularly
    1. The short ton of 2000 pounds (about 907 kg), 20 hundredweights of 100 pounds avoirdupois each.
    2. The long ton of 2240 pounds (about 1016 kg), 20 hundredweights of 112 pounds avoirdupois each.
    3. The metric ton of 1000 kilograms, 10 quintals of 100 kilograms each.
  2. Any of various units of volume, (historical) originally notionally equal to the contents of a tun, particularly
    1. The measurement ton of (US) 40 or (UK) 42 cubic feet (about 1.1 or 1.2 ).
    2. The register ton of 100 cubic feet (about 2.83 ).
  3. (figuratively) Any large, excessive, or overwhelming amount of anything.
    I’ve got a ton of work to do.
    I've got tons of work to do.
  4. (HVAC) A unit of thermal power equal to 12,000 BTU/h (about 3.5 kW), approximating the idealized rate of cooling provided by uniform isothermal melting of 1 short ton of ice per day at 0°C.
  5. (slang, chiefly UK) Synonym of hundred, particularly
    1. 100 pounds sterling.
    2. (darts, snooker, etc.) 100 points.
    3. (cricket) 100 runs.
    4. A speed of 100 mph.
      • 1970, Mungo Jerry (lyrics and music), “In The Summertime”, in In The Summertime:
        Speed along the lane / Do a ton or a ton and twenty-five
      • 2008, Damon Beesley & Iain Morris, "Caravan Club", The Inbetweeners Series 1, Episode 5, E4:
        Neil: How fast can this thing go then, do you reckon?
        Simon: Well, it's the special edition, so I reckon it could probably top a ton.
        Neil: Bollocks!
      • 2021 October 6, Greg Morse, “A need for speed and the drive for 125”, in RAIL, number 941, page 50:
        The HSDT team, however, had some work to do, although by the end of 1972 the power car interior had been adjusted and BR had agreed to 'double-manning' with extra pay when speeds topped the ton.
SynonymsEdit
  • (traditional unit of mass equivalent to a tun): tonelada (Spanish and Portuguese contexts)
  • (any hyperbolically or oppressively large amount): See Thesaurus:lot
  • (slang for 100 points in darts &c.): tonne
  • (slang for 100 cricket runs): century
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Tokelauan: tone, tane
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French ton (manner), from Latin tonus. Doublet of tone, tune, and tonus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton (uncountable)

  1. Fashion, the current style, the vogue.
  2. Fashionable society; those in style.
    • 1790, Amelia Opie, Dangers of Coquetry, vol. I, ch. 13:
      [S]he thought herself incapable of being flattered by the attentions of a man she despised, because he was the reigning idol of the ton [] .
    • 1823 December 17, [Lord Byron], Don Juan. Cantos XII.—XIII.—and XIV., London: [] [C. H. Reynell] for John Hunt, [], OCLC 868008434, canto XIII(please specify the stanza number):
      The party might consist of thirty three Of highest caste—the Brahmins of the ton.
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 30, in The History of Pendennis. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1849–1850, OCLC 2057953:
      Pen was somewhat older than many of his fellow-students, and there was that about his style and appearance, which, as we have said, was rather haughty and impertinent, that stamped him as a man of ton—very unlike those pale students who were talking law to one another, and those ferocious dandies, in rowing shirts and astonishing pins and waistcoats, who represented the idle part of the little community.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

ton (plural tons)

  1. Synonym of tunny, particularly the common tunny or horse mackerel.

AnagramsEdit


Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French thon.

NounEdit

ton

  1. tuna

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan ton, from Vulgar Latin *tum, reduced form of Latin tuus, tuum, from Proto-Italic *towos. Compare Occitan and French ton.

In unstressed position in Vulgar Latin tuum, tuam etc. were monosyllabic and regularly became ton, ta etc. in Catalan. When stressed they were disyllabic and became teu, tua > teua etc.

DeterminerEdit

ton m (feminine ta, masculine plural tos, feminine plural tes)

  1. your (singular)

Usage notesEdit

The use of ton and the other possessive determiners is mostly archaic in the majority of dialects, with articulated possessive pronouns (e.g. el meu) mostly being used in their stead. However, mon, ton, and son are still widely used before certain nouns referring to family members and some affective nouns, such as amic, casa, and vida. Which nouns actually find use with the possessive determiners depends greatly on the locale.

The standard masculine plural form is tos, but tons can be found in some dialects.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “ton” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

ton

  1. torch

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

ton

  1. fur coat

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From English ton, variant of tun (cask).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton c or n (singular definite tonnet or tonnen, plural indefinite ton or tons, abbreviation t)

  1. ton (unit of weight)

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tonne, from Medieval Latin tunna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton f (plural tonnen, diminutive tonnetje n)

  1. barrel
  2. ton (1000 kilograms)
  3. 100,000 of some monetary unit, particularly guilders
    Dat zou zeker een ton kosten.
    Dat zou zeker een ton euro kosten.
    140.000 euro is bijna drie ton gulden
  4. A large amount.
    Hij leende tonnen met geld. - He borrowed large amounts of money.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronounEdit

ton

  1. (colloquial) genitive singular of toi
  2. (colloquial) accusative singular of toi

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French ton, tos, from Latin tuus.

DeterminerEdit

ton m (feminine ta, plural tes)

  1. (possessive) your
    Tu as pensé à prendre ton livre ?
    Did you remember to bring your book?
    Ton écriture est jolie.
    Your writing is pretty.
    J'aime beaucoup ton manteau.
    I really like your coat.
Usage notesEdit

Ton is used before all singular nouns beginning with a vowel or a mute H, even those that are feminine. However, ta is used with singular feminine nouns beginning with an aspirated H.

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin tonus. Doublet of tonus, a later borrowing.

NounEdit

ton m (plural tons)

  1. tone (sound of a particular frequency)
  2. (music) tone (interval)
    Il y a un ton entre do et
    Doh and ray are separated by one tone.
  3. tone (manner of speaking)
    Je n'aime pas le ton sur lequel tu me parles!
    I don’t like your tone! (I don’t like the way you are talking to me!)
  4. tone, shade (of colour)
    Différents tons de rouge.
    Several shades of red.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Turkish: ton

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tonus, from Ancient Greek τόνος (tónos). Compare Italian tuono, Romansch tun, tung, Dalmatian tun, Romanian tun.

NounEdit

ton m (plural tons)

  1. thunder
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin thunnus, from Ancient Greek θύννος (thúnnos). Compare Italian tonno.

NounEdit

ton m (plural tons)

  1. tuna

Etymology 3Edit

Ultimately borrowed from Latin tonus. Compare French ton, Italian tono.

NounEdit

ton m (plural tons)

  1. tone

FulaEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

AdverbEdit

ton

  1. there, over there

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English ton.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tôn m

  1. ton (unit of weight)

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɔn]
  • Hyphenation: ton

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch ton, from Middle Dutch tonne, from Old French [Term?], from Latin tunna, tonna, itself from a Celtic word cognate to Irish tonn (skin).

NounEdit

ton (first-person possessive tonku, second-person possessive tonmu, third-person possessive tonnya)

  1. ton:
    1. tonne, metric ton: a unit of weight (mass) equal to 1000 kilograms.
    2. register ton, a unit of a ship's capacity equal to 100 cubic feet or 2.83 m3.
    3. long ton, weight ton: the avoirdupois or Imperial ton of 2,240 pounds (1,016.0469 kg).
    4. displacement ton
  2. (colloquial) A thousand rupiah.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch toon, from Middle Dutch toon, ultimately from Latin tonus.

NounEdit

ton (first-person possessive tonku, second-person possessive tonmu, third-person possessive tonnya)

  1. alternative form of tona (tone)

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

ton m (genitive singular toin, nominative plural toin)

  1. (biology, literature, music) tone

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ton thon dton
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ton

  1. Rōmaji transcription of とん

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English tān; equivalent to to +‎ -en (plural suffix).

NounEdit

ton

  1. plural of to (toe)

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • toun (Anglo-Norman)
  • tun (Anglo-Norman)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tuus, tuum.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

ton m (feminine ta, plural tes)

  1. your (second-person singular possessive)

DescendantsEdit


Old JavaneseEdit

VerbEdit

ton

  1. to see; to look

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin thunnus.

NounEdit

ton m (oblique plural tons, nominative singular tons, nominative plural ton)

  1. tuna (fish)

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton m inan

  1. (linguistics, music) tone
    Synonyms: barwa, brzmienie, zabarwienie

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

adjectives
adverbs
nouns
verbs

Further readingEdit

  • ton in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ton in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French thon.

NounEdit

ton m (plural toni)

  1. tuna
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French ton, from Latin tonus. Doublet of tun.

NounEdit

ton n (plural tonuri)

  1. tone
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tȏn m (Cyrillic spelling то̑н)

  1. tone

DeclensionEdit


Skolt SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *tonë.

PronounEdit

ton

  1. you (singular)

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton m (uncountable)

  1. acopocic of tono

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English ton.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton n

  1. tonne
DeclensionEdit
Declension of ton 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ton tonnet ton tonnen
Genitive tons tonnets tons tonnens
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin tonus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton c

  1. tone (sound of a particular frequency)
  2. (music) tone (interval)
  3. tone (behaviour)
    att hålla god tonto talk politely (e.g. in a debate)
  4. tone, shade (of colour)
DeclensionEdit
Declension of ton 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ton tonen toner tonerna
Genitive tons tonens toners tonernas
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Ter SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *tonë.

PronounEdit

ton

  1. you (singular)

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[2], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

TernateEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ton

  1. Alternative form of toni (flying fish)

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French ton.

NounEdit

ton (definite accusative tonu, plural tonlar)

  1. tone (all senses)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French tonne.

NounEdit

ton (definite accusative tonu, plural tonlar)

  1. tonne, metric ton

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from French thon.

NounEdit

ton (definite accusative tonu, plural tonlar)

  1. tuna
    Synonym: ton balığı

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

ton (nominative plural tons)

  1. sound

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Welsh tonn, from Proto-Brythonic *tonn, from Proto-Celtic *tundā.

NounEdit

ton f (plural tonnau)

  1. wave, billow
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Middle Welsh tonn, from Proto-Celtic *tondā (surface), from the o-grade of Proto-Indo-European *tend- ~ *temh₁- (to cut).

NounEdit

ton m (plural tonnau)

  1. ley, unploughed land
Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ton don nhon thon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ZuniEdit

PronounEdit

ton

  1. Second person dual subject (medial position)
    you two
  2. Second person plural subject (medial position)
    you (three or more)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit