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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vituperātus, perfect passive participle of vituperō (I blame, I censure), from vitium (fault, defect) + parō (I furnish, I provide, I contrive).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /vɪˈtʃuːpəɹeɪt/, /vɪˈtjuːpəɹeɪt/, /vaɪˈtʃuːpəɹeɪt/, /vaɪˈtjuːpəɹeɪt/

VerbEdit

vituperate (third-person singular simple present vituperates, present participle vituperating, simple past and past participle vituperated)

  1. (transitive) To criticize in a harsh or abusive manner.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, in The Celebrity:
      Mr. Cooke at once began a tirade against the residents of Asquith for permitting a sandy and generally disgraceful condition of the roads. So roundly did he vituperate the inn management in particular, and with such a loud flow of words, that I trembled lest he should be heard on the veranda.
  2. (transitive) To revile, vilify, defame, go on about or mouth off about someone
  3. (intransitive) To use harsh or abusive wording.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

vituperāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of vituperō

ReferencesEdit