Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: volé, volê, and vøle

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Norn [Term?], from Old Norse vǫllr (field), q.v. The Orkney dialectal name vole mouse, lit. "field mouse", was introduced to general English by George Barry in 1805; John Fleming in 1828 was first to refer to the creature by the epithet vole alone. Displaced earlier names for these species which also classified them as mice, e.g. short-tailed field mouse.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vole (plural voles)

  1. Any of a large number of species of small rodents of the subfamily Arvicolinae of the family Cricetidae which are not lemmings or muskrats.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

French

NounEdit

vole (plural voles)

  1. A deal in a card game, écarté, that draws all the tricks.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Verses on the Death of Dr Swift
      Ladies, I'll venture for the vole.

VerbEdit

vole (third-person singular simple present voles, present participle voling, simple past and past participle voled)

  1. (card games, intransitive) To win all the tricks by a vole.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Alexander Pope to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for vole in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Declension of vůl.

NounEdit

vole

  1. vocative singular of vůl

InterjectionEdit

vole

  1. (informal) man, dude
Usage notesEdit

This interjection is considered vulgar by some people, its primary meaning being "you ass"; however, it is today quite frequently used in very informal speech without any vulgar overtones, either as a friendly address or as an emphasizer; some people lard their talk with it without its having any meaning (similarly to the way some people use "fuck" in English, but "vole" is not so strong). It is often used in the form "ty vole".

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic with unclear origin; possibly related with German schwellen, Wulst.[1][2]

NounEdit

vole n

  1. crop, craw (pouch-like part of the alimentary tract of some birds)
  2. (obsolete) goitre
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Conjugation of volit.

VerbEdit

vole

  1. masculine singular present transgressive of volit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ vole in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ "vole" in Václav Machek, Etymologický slovník jazyka českého, second edition, Academia, 1968

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

vole

  1. voluntarily

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

vole

  1. present of voler
  2. imperative of voler

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

vole

  1. (archaic) third-person singular indicative present of volere

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


VolapükEdit

NounEdit

vole

  1. dative singular of vol