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See also: Wen, weń, wên, wēn, wén, wěn, and wèn

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wen, wenne, from Old English wenn, wænn (wen), from Proto-Germanic *wanjaz. Cognate with Dutch wen (goiter), Low German Ween (wen), dialectal German Wenne (wen), Danish van, væne.

NounEdit

wen (plural wens)

  1. A cyst on the skin.
    • 1854, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Walden:
      When I have met an immigrant tottering under a bundle which contained his all--looking like an enormous wen which had grown out of the nape of his neck--I have pitied him, not because that was his all, but because he had all that to carry.
    • 1973, Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow:
      Creeps, foreigners with tinted, oily skin, wens, sties, cysts, wheezes, bad teeth, limps, staring or—worse—with Strange Faraway Smiles.
    • 1996, David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest, Abacus 2013, p. 4:
      I am debating whether to risk scratching the right side of my jaw, where there is a wen.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English wynn

NounEdit

wen (plural wens)

  1. a runic letter later replaced by w

Etymology 3Edit

Eye dialect spelling of when.

AdverbEdit

wen (not comparable)

  1. (eye dialect) Alternative spelling of when

ConjunctionEdit

wen

  1. (eye dialect) Alternative spelling of when

PronounEdit

wen

  1. (eye dialect) Alternative spelling of when

NounEdit

wen (uncountable)

  1. (eye dialect) Alternative spelling of when

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch winnen, from Middle Dutch winnen, from Old Dutch winnan, from Proto-Germanic *winnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (to strive, desire, wish, love).

VerbEdit

wen (present wen, present participle wennende, past participle gewen)

  1. to win

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʋɛn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hwannē. Cognate with English when, German wann.

AdverbEdit

wen

  1. (archaic) when
    En ik dacht aan den geur harer bloesems, aan het huiveren harer takken, aan den zang harer vogelen; en ik vroeg mij: wen rieken wij die? (V. Someren, 1822)
    And I thought about the scent of her blossoms, at the shuddering of her branches, at the songs of her birds, and I asked myself: when do we smell these?

ConjunctionEdit

wen

  1. (archaic) when
    Daar heb ik wen de vogels vlogen, heimelik in elk nest geschouwd! (L. De Mont, 1880)
    There have I, when the birds flew, looked privily in each nest!

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

wen

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wennen
  2. imperative of wennen

ElfdalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

wen

  1. what

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

wen

  1. (interrogative) accusative of wer: whom (direct object).
    Wen hast du gefragt?
    Whom did you ask?

Further readingEdit

  • wen in Duden online

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

wēn

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌴𐌽

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

wen

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ゑん

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

wen

  1. Nonstandard spelling of wēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of wén.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of wěn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of wèn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

wen

  1. Alternative form of wayn (wagon)

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wēniz, from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (love). Cognate with Old Frisian wen, Old Saxon wan, Old High German wān (German Wahn ‘delusion’), Old Norse ván, Gothic 𐍅𐌴𐌽𐍃 (wēns).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wēn f

  1. hope, belief
  2. expectation, likelihood

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


WelshEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wen

  1. Soft mutation of gwen (white (feminine)).

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gwen wen ngwen unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.