See also: Yank

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Attested since 1822; from Scots. Unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yank ‎(plural yanks)

  1. A sudden, vigorous pull (sometimes defined as mass times jerk, or rate of change of force).
  2. A masturbation session
    • 31 December 2011 The Biology Project, Chapter 9, by Jennyfer Browne
      So much for a quick yank to get me through Biology.
SynonymsEdit
  • (sudden, vigorous pull): jerk, tug
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

yank ‎(third-person singular simple present yanks, present participle yanking, simple past and past participle yanked)

  1. (transitive) To pull something with a quick, strong action.
    • 2015, Elizabeth Royte, Vultures Are Revolting. Here’s Why We Need to Save Them., National Geographic (December 2015)[1]
      Now a white-backed rams its head down the wildebeest’s throat and yanks out an eight-inch length of trachea, ribbed like a vacuum hose.
  2. (transitive) To remove from distribution.
    They yanked the product as soon as they learned it was unsafe.
SynonymsEdit
  • (pull with a quick strong action): jerk, tug
  • (remove from circulation): pull, recall
Derived termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • yank” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of yankee

NounEdit

yank ‎(plural yanks)

  1. (often derogatory) A yankee.
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