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See also: þar, y ar, yar-, yär-, 'yar, and ƴar

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ȝaren, ȝurren, ȝeorren, from Old English ġeorran, ġirran, gyrran (to sound, chatter, grunt, creak, grate), from Proto-Germanic *gerraną (to creak), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰer- (to make a noise, rattle, gurgle, grumble). Cognate with Scots yarr, yirr (to snarl, growl, quarrel, cause trouble), Middle High German girren (to roar, cry, rattle, chatter).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

yar (third-person singular simple present yars, present participle yarring, simple past and past participle yarred)

  1. (intransitive) To snarl; to gnar.
  2. (intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To growl, especially like a dog; quarrel; to be captious or troublesome.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain.

AdjectiveEdit

yar (comparative more yar, superlative most yar)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Sour; brackish.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English gearu (ready), from Proto-Germanic *garwaz.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

yar (comparative yarer, superlative yarest)

  1. (nautical, of a vessel, especially sailboat) Quick and agile; easy to hand, reef and steer.
    1939 My, she was yar...It means, uh...easy to handle, quick to the helm, fast, right. Everything a boat should be, until she develops dry rot. - The Philadelphia Story written by Philip Barry
    • 1958, Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
      ...to make a ship best weighed, or yarest in her going.
    1993 Arr, here be a fine vessel: the yarest river-going boat there be. - Captain McAllister The Simpsons ep. 1F06
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *jaro- (compare Welsh iâr).

NounEdit

yar f (plural yer)

  1. hen

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *jaro- (compare Welsh iâr).

NounEdit

yar f (plural yer)

  1. chicken, hen

Derived termsEdit


KalashaEdit

SomaliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

yar

  1. small

TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ottoman Turkish يار (yar, precipice), from Proto-Turkic *jạ̄r (precipice, steep bank).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yar (definite accusative yarı, plural yarlar)

  1. cliff, scarp, precipice

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

yar

  1. imperative of yarmak

Etymology 3Edit

From Ottoman Turkish يار (yār, friend, a beloved friend, one's lover), from Persian یار (yâr).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yar (definite accusative yari, plural yarlar)

  1. beloved; lover
  2. friend

DeclensionEdit

  • Before consonantal endings, the stem vowel is pronounced short and the endings themselves have back vowels. In the accusative, dative, and genitive singular, the stem vowel is pronounced long and the endings accordingly take front vowels. The declension is thus irregular:
Singular: nom. yar — acc. yari — dat. yare — loc. yarda — abl. yardan — gen. yarin
Plural: nom. yarlar — acc. yarları — dat. yarlara — loc. yarlarda — abl. yarlardan — gen. yarların