Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 09:23

blank

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English blank, blonc, blaunc, blaunche, from Anglo-Norman blonc, blaunc, blaunche from Old French blanc, feminine blanche, from Frankish *blank (gleaming, white, blinding) from Proto-Germanic *blankaz (white, bright, blinding), from Proto-Indo-European *bhleg- (to shine). Akin to Old High German blanch (shining, bright, white) (German blank), Old English blanc (white, grey), blanca (white steed), English blink, blind. See also blink, blind, and blanch.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blank (comparative blanker or more blank, superlative blankest or most blank)

  1. (archaic) White or pale; without colour.
    • Milton
      To the blank moon / Her office they prescribed.
  2. Free from writing, printing, or marks; having an empty space to be filled in; as, blank paper; a blank check; a blank ballot.
    • 2011 December 27, Mike Henson, “Norwich 0 - 2 Tottenham”, BBC Sport:
      Referee Michael Oliver failed to detect a foul in a crowded box and the Canaries escaped down the tunnel with the scoreline still blank.
  3. (figuratively) Lacking characteristics which give variety; uniform.
    a blank desert; a blank wall; blank unconsciousness
  4. Absolute; downright; unmixed; sheer.
    blank terror
  5. Without expression.
    Failing to understand the question, he gave me a blank stare.
  6. Utterly confounded or discomfited.
    • Milton
      Adam [] astonied stood, and blank.
  7. Empty; void; without result; fruitless.
    a blank day
  8. Devoid of thoughts, memory, or inspiration.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

blank (plural blanks)

  1. A cartridge that is designed to simulate the noise and smoke of real gunfire without actually firing a projectile.
  2. An empty space; a void, as on a paper, or in one's memory.
    • Jonathan Swift
      I cannot write a paper full, I used to do; and yet I will not forgive a blank of half an inch from you.
    • Hallam
      From this time there ensues a long blank in the history of French legislation.
    • George Eliot
      I was ill. I can't tell how long — it was a blank.
  3. A space to be filled in on a form or template.
  4. A paper without marks or characters, or with space left for writing; a ballot, form, contract, etc. that has not yet been filled in.
    • Palfrey
      The freemen signified their approbation by an inscribed vote, and their dissent by a blank.
  5. A lot by which nothing is gained; a ticket in a lottery on which no prize is indicated.
    • Dryden
      In Fortune's lottery lies / A heap of blanks, like this, for one small prize.
  6. (archaic) A kind of base silver money, first coined in England by Henry V., and worth about 8 pence; also, a French coin of the seventeenth century, worth about 4 pence.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)
  7. (engineering) A piece of metal prepared to be made into something by a further operation, as a coin, screw, nuts.
  8. (dominoes) A piece or division of a piece, without spots; as, the double blank"; the six blank." In blank, with an essential portion to be supplied by another; as, to make out a check in blank.
  9. The space character; the character resulting from pressing the space-bar on a keyboard.
  10. The point aimed at in a target, marked with a white spot; hence, the object to which anything is directed.
    • Shakespeare
      Let me still remain / The true blank of thine eye.
  11. Aim; shot; range.
    • Shakespeare
      I have stood [] within the blank of his displeasure / For my free speech.
  12. (chemistry) A sample for a control experiment that does not contain any of the analyte of interest, in order to deliberately produce a non-detection to verify that a detection is distinguishable from it.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

blank (third-person singular simple present blanks, present participle blanking, simple past and past participle blanked)

  1. (transitive) To make void; to erase.
    I blanked out my previous entry.
  2. (transitive, slang) To ignore.
    She blanked me for no reason.
  3. (transitive) To prevent from scoring, as in a sporting event.
    The team was blanked.
  4. (intransitive) To become blank.

Usage notesEdit

  • Almost any sense of this can occur with out. See blank out.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch blank.

AdjectiveEdit

blank (attributive blanke, comparative blanker, superlative blankste)

  1. white
  2. White; Caucasian

AntonymsEdit


DalmatianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blank m (plural blanke, feminine blanca)

  1. white

ReferencesEdit

  • 2000, Matteo Giulio Bartoli, Il Dalmatico: Resti di un’antica lingua romanza parlata da Veglia a Ragusa e sua collocazione nella Romània appenino-balcanica, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana.

DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blank (neuter blankt, definite and plural blanke, comparative blankere, superlative blankest)

  1. bright, shining, glossy
  2. empty
  3. blank
  4. broke (be without money)

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blank (comparative blanker, superlative blankst)

  1. white, pale
  2. (race) White, Caucasian.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blank (comparative blanker, superlative am blanksten)

  1. pure, sheer
    Blanke Wut packte ihn. — Sheer anger seized him.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German blank, from Old Saxon blank, from Proto-Germanic *blankaz. Displaced native Swedish black, from Old Norse blakkr.

AdjectiveEdit

blank (comparative blankare, superlative blankast)

  1. reflective, shiny

InflectionEdit