See also: self-

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English self, silf, sulf, from Old English self, seolf, sylf (same, self, very, own), from Proto-Germanic *selbaz (self), from Proto-Indo-European *selbʰ- (one's own), from Proto-Indo-European *s(w)e- (separate, apart). Cognate with Scots self (self), West Frisian self (self), Dutch zelf (self), Low German sulv (self), German selbst (self), Danish selv (self), Icelandic sjálfur (self). Possibly related to Albanian thelb (core, center, heart).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

self

  1. (obsolete) Himself, herself, itself, themselves; that specific (person mentioned).
    This argument was put forward by the defendant self.
  2. (commercial or humorous) Myself.
    I made out a cheque, payable to self, which cheered me up somewhat.

NounEdit

self (plural selves or selfs)

  1. The subject of one's own experience of phenomena: perception, emotions, thoughts...
  2. An individual person as the object of his own reflective consciousness (plural selves).
    • Sir W. Hamilton
      The self, the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3: 
      In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.
  3. (botany) A seedling produced by self-pollination (plural selfs).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

self (third-person singular simple present selfs, present participle selfing, simple past and past participle selfed)

  1. (botany) To fertilise by the same individual; to self-fertilise or self-pollinate.
  2. (botany) To fertilise by the same strain; to inbreed.

AntonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

self

  1. (obsolete) same
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, I.i:
      I am made of that self mettle as my sister.
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      on these self hills
    • Dryden
      At that self moment enters Palamon.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


MalteseEdit

NounEdit

self

  1. loan

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz, whence also Old Frisian self, Old Saxon self, Old Dutch self, Old High German selb, Old Norse sjálfr, Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌻𐌱𐌰 (silba). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *selbʰ- (one's own), from *s(w)e- (separate, apart).

PronounEdit

self

  1. self

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz, whence also Old English self, Old Frisian self, Old Dutch self, Old High German selb, Old Norse sjálfr, Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌻𐌱𐌰 (silba). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *selbʰ- (one's own), from *s(w)e- (separate, apart).

PronounEdit

self

  1. self

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German: sulv
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 21:15