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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

abound (third-person singular simple present abounds, present participle abounding, simple past and past participle abounded)

  1. (intransitive) To be full to overflowing. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).][1]
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To be wealthy. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the mid 18th century.][1]
  3. (intransitive) To be highly productive.
  4. (intransitive) To be present or available in large numbers; to be plentiful. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).][1]
    Wild animals abound wherever man does not stake his claim.
    • Where sin abounded grace did much more abound. Romans 5:20.
  5. (intransitive) To revel in. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 18th century.][1]
  6. (intransitive) To be copiously supplied
    The wilderness abounds in traps.
    • The wild boar which abounds in some parts of the continent of Europe. - Chambers.

Usage notesEdit

  • (copiously supplied): Abound is followed by in or with.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 “abound” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 7.