EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

any +‎ way

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛniweɪ/
  • (file)

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

anyway (not comparable)

  1. (conjunctive) Regardless; anyhow. [from 19th c.]
    He didn't enjoy washing his car, but it was so dirty that he did it anyway.
    • 2016, JoAnneh Nagler, How to be an artist without losing your mind, your shirt, or your creative compass, →ISBN, page 85:
      Raymond Carver had only moments late at night to write after grueling day jobs, tense relationships, putting kids to bed, and dealing with his own alcoholism. And he wrote anyway.
  2. Used to indicate that a statement explains or supports a previous statement. See anyhow and at least. [from 19th c.]
    I don't think that's true. I haven't found any evidence, anyway.
    • 1962, Bob Dylan, Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
      But I wish there were somethin' you would do or say / To try and make me change my mind and stay / We never did too much talkin' anyway / Don't think twice, it's all right.
  3. Used to indicate a change of subject.
    • 2005, Jan Karon, These High, Green Hills:
      "I'll be ninety my next birthday, but Louella doesn't tell her age. Anyway, we're going to have you and Cynthia up for supper."
  4. Used at the end of a question for emphasis, or to direct the conversation to something of more broad importance (compare with more to the point).
    • 1899, Jack London, “To the Man on the Trail”, The Overland Monthly, page 36:
      “But I say, Kid, isn't that going it a little too strong? Whisky and alcohol's bad enough; but when it comes to brandy and pepper-sauce and—” ¶ “Dump it in. Who's making this punch, anyway?”
    • 1990, Ted Koppel, Nightline:
      The name, Barry Frank, the name of the game when it comes to money these days, in every sport, is television revenue. How do they get enough money- let me back up a minute. How did the United States get the World Cup anyway? Of all the countries in the world, you'd think we'd be the last one to get it.
      Accessed via COCA
    • 1992, Timothy Zahn, Heir to the Empire, Spectra (→ISBN), page 154:
      “We should probably wait until Luke gets here to talk about it,” Leia suggested quietly before Han could answer. Lando glanced past Han, as if only just noticing Luke's absence. “Where is he, anyway?”
  5. (obsolete) In any way. [16th-19th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 2, member 5:
      He that sleeps in the day-time, or is in suspense, fear, anyway troubled in mind, or goes to bed upon a full stomach, may never hope for quiet rest in the night […].

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English anyway

AdverbEdit

anyway

  1. Used to indicate a change of topic.

SynonymsEdit