Last modified on 23 April 2015, at 17:42

arrear

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arere, ariere, from Vulgar Latin ad retro (to the rear).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

arrear (comparative more arrear, superlative most arrear)

  1. (obsolete) Towards the rear, backwards. [14th-16th c.]
    • 1591, Edmund Spenser, Virgil's Gnat, ll. 465-8:
      She, (Ladie) having well before approoved / The feends to be too cruell and severe, / Observ'd th' appointed way, as her behooved, / Ne ever did her ey-sight turne arere [...].
  2. (obsolete) Behind time; overdue. [15th-19th c.]
    • 1803, Edward Hyde East, Reports of cases Argued and determined in the Court of King's Bench, London 1814, vol. 3, p. 559:
      In case the annuity should be arrear for sixty days being lawfully demanded, then the trustee might enter upon the premises assigned [...].

NounEdit

arrear (plural arrears)

  1. Work to be done, obligation.
    I have a large arrear of letters to write. -- J. D. Forbes.
    My own work, with its manifold arrears, took me all day to clear off. -- Stoker, Dracula
  2. Unpaid debt.

TranslationsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from a Vulgar Latin *arredāre (arrange, provide).

VerbEdit

arrear (first-person singular present indicative arreio, past participle arreado)

  1. (transitive) to harness (to place a harness on something)

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cf. arre.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

arrear (first-person singular present arreo, first-person singular preterite arreé, past participle arreado)

  1. to urge
  2. to harness

ConjugationEdit