See also: Symbol

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Symbols of various religions.

From French symbole, from Latin symbolus, symbolum (a sign, mark, token, symbol, in Late Latin also a creed), from Ancient Greek σύμβολον (súmbolon, a sign by which one infers something; a mark, token, badge, ticket, tally, check, a signal, watchword, outward sign), from συμβάλλω (sumbállō, I throw together, dash together, compare, correspond, tally, come to a conclusion), from σύν (sún, with, together) + βάλλω (bállō, I throw, put).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

symbol (plural symbols)

  1. A character or glyph representing an idea, concept or object.
    $ is the symbol for dollars in the US and some other countries.
    Chinese people use word symbols for writing.
  2. Any object, typically material, which is meant to represent another (usually abstract) even if there is no meaningful relationship.
    The lion is the symbol of courage; the lamb is the symbol of meekness or patience.
  3. (linguistics) A type of noun whereby the form refers to the same entity independently of the context; a symbol arbitrarily denotes a referent. See also icon and index.
  4. A summary of a dogmatic statement of faith.
    The Apostles, Nicene Creed and the confessional books of Protestantism, such as the Augsburg Confession of Lutheranism are considered symbols.
  5. (crystallography) The numerical expression which defines a plane's position relative to the assumed axes.
  6. (obsolete) That which is thrown into a common fund; hence, an appointed or accustomed duty.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      They do their work in the days of peace [] and come to pay their symbol in a war or in a plague.
  7. (obsolete) Share; allotment.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The persons who are to be judged [] shall all appear to receive their symbol.
  8. (programming) An internal identifier used by a debugger to relate parts of the compiled program to the corresponding names in the source code.
  9. (telecommunications) A signalling event on a communications channel; a signal that cannot be further divided into meaningful information.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

symbol (third-person singular simple present symbols, present participle symboling or symbolling, simple past and past participle symboled or symbolled)

  1. To symbolize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tennyson to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

symbol m

  1. symbol

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σύμβολον (súmbolon, a sign by which one infers something; a mark, token, badge, ticket, tally, check, a signal, watchword, outward sign).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

symbol n (singular definite symbolet, plural indefinite symboler)

  1. symbol

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σύμβολον (súmbolon)

NounEdit

symbol n (definite singular symbolet, indefinite plural symbol or symboler, definite plural symbola or symbolene)

  1. a symbol

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σύμβολον (súmbolon)

NounEdit

symbol n (definite singular symbolet, indefinite plural symbol, definite plural symbola)

  1. a symbol

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin symbolum, cognate with English symbol.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

symbol c

  1. symbol

DeclensionEdit

Declension of symbol 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative symbol symbolen symboler symbolerna
Genitive symbols symbolens symbolers symbolernas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English symbol, from French symbole, from Latin symbolus, symbolum (a sign, mark, token, symbol, in Late Latin also a creed), from Ancient Greek σύμβολον (súmbolon, a sign by which one infers something; a mark, token, badge, ticket, tally, check, a signal, watchword, outward sign).

PronunciationEdit

Usage notesEdit

Being a word borrowed from English derived from Greek, the y in symbol is pronounced /ɨ̞, ɪ/ rather than expected /ə/. To preserve consistency between pronunciation and spelling, some prefer to spell this word sumbol. Nevertheless, symbol is the more common spelling of the two. See pyramid/puramid, synthesis/sunthesis, system/sustem for similar examples.

NounEdit

symbol m (plural symbolau)

  1. symbol

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “symbol”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies