See also: Bod, BOD, böd, bød, and boð

Translingual

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Symbol

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bod

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2/T & ISO 639-3 language code for Tibetan.

English

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Etymology

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Clipping of body. The "person" sense may alternatively derive from Scottish Gaelic bodach (old man) via Scots.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod (plural bods)

  1. (slang) The body.
    Fred likes to keep his bod in shape.
  2. (slang) A person.
    • 2005, Richard Templar, The Rules of Management, page 73:
      There were cameras covering car parks, offices, corridors and storage areas in the basement. Result. The security bods started watching as if their lives depended on it.
    • 2021 December 29, Stephen Roberts, “Stories and Facts behind railway plaques: Reading (1840)”, in RAIL, number 947, page 56:
      People such as William James and the Stephensons (with whom he collaborated) may have been the movers and shakers of the early railways, but there was other, less exalted bods who constructed all the paraphernalia - including stations.

Derived terms

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See also

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References

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  1. ^ Chambers 21st Century Dictionary, "bod (noun)"

Anagrams

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Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology

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Inherited from Old Czech bod, from Proto-Slavic *bodъ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod m inan

  1. (geometry) point
  2. (temperature) point
    bod mrazufreezing point
  3. item (of an agenda)
  4. (sports) point, mark
  5. stab
    • 1866, Josef Bojislav Pichl, transl., Don Quijote de la Mancha[1], Praha: I. L. Kober, translation of original by Miguel de Cervantes, page 34:
      Na moutě duchu! zvolal po těch slovích Sancho; ať nedím tři tisíce šlehů, ale ani tři si nedám, jako nedal bych si tři body dýkou.
      "By all that's good," exclaimed Sancho at this, "I'll just as soon give myself three stabs with a dagger as three, not to say three thousand, lashes.

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • bod”, in Příruční slovník jazyka českého (in Czech), 1935-1957
  • bod”, in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého (in Czech), 1960–1971, 1989
  • bod”, in Internetová jazyková příručka (in Czech)

Anagrams

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Danish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /boːˀð/, [ˈb̥oˀð], [ˈb̥oðˀ]
  • Rhymes: -oːð

Etymology 1

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From Old Danish bōð, from Old East Norse bóð, from Proto-Germanic *bōþō (building, dwelling), cognate with Old West Norse búð, English booth, German Bude.

Noun

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bod c (singular definite boden, plural indefinite boder)

  1. booth, stall
  2. shop
Declension
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Etymology 2

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From Old Norse bót, from Proto-Germanic *bōtō (improvement, atonement), cognate with Swedish bot, English boot, German Buße, Dutch boete. Doublet of bøde.

Noun

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bod c (singular definite boden, not used in plural form)

  1. fine
  2. penance
Usage notes
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Now especially in the phrases gøre bod, råde bod.

Declension
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Derived terms
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Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch bot, from Old Dutch *bot, from Proto-West Germanic *bod, from Proto-Germanic *budą.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod n (plural boden, diminutive bodje n)

  1. order
  2. offer

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Sranan Tongo: bot

Irish

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Etymology

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From Middle Irish bot (tail; penis), from Proto-Celtic *buzdos (tail, penis) (cf. Welsh both (hub), Breton bod (bush, shrub)), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *gʷosdʰos (piece of wood). For the archaic sense, compare English dick (mean person, jerk, etc.).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod m (genitive singular boid, nominative plural boid)

  1. penis
    Synonym: cuideog (euphemistic)
  2. (archaic) churl, boor, lout

Declension

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Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bod bhod mbod
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology

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From Old West Norse boð, from Proto-Germanic *budą (offer, message), cognate with Icelandic boð, Dutch bod, German Gebot.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod n (definite singular bodet, indefinite plural bod, definite plural boda)

  1. message
    Synonym: melding
    Eg kjem med bod.
    I come with a message.
  2. offer
  3. (in compounds) messenger, delivery man
    PostbodMailman

Derived terms

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See also

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References

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Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *bod. Cognate with Old Norse boð.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod n (nominative plural bodu)

  1. a command, mandate, precept, order; bidding

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Borrowed from French baud, named after French telegraph engineer and inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod m inan

  1. (computing, telecommunications) baud

Declension

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Further reading

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  • bod in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology

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From Middle Irish bot (tail; penis), from Proto-Celtic *buzdos (tail, penis), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *gʷosdʰos (piece of wood).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod m (genitive singular boid, plural boid)

  1. (anatomy) penis

Mutation

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Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
bod bhod
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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  • Edward Dwelly (1911) “bod”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary]‎[2], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “1 bot”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *bodъ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bȏd m (Cyrillic spelling бо̑д)

  1. sting (with a needle or a sharp object)
  2. (embroidery, knitting) stitch
  3. (sports) point
    Synonym: poen
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from English baud.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bȏd m (Cyrillic spelling бо̑д)

  1. baud
Declension
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Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish boþ, from Old Norse bóð (Compare Old West Norse búð), from Proto-Germanic *bōþō (dwelling).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bod c

  1. a shed
    vedbod
    woodshed
  2. a small shop
    1. a stall
      bodar på en julmarknad
      stalls at a Christmas market

Declension

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Declension of bod 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bod boden bodar bodarna
Genitive bods bodens bodars bodarnas

Derived terms

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See also

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References

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Volapük

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German Brot, English bread and Dutch brood.

Noun

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bod (nominative plural bods)

  1. bread

Declension

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Derived terms

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Welsh

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Etymology

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From Middle Welsh bot, from Proto-Celtic *butā (cf. Cornish bos, Breton bout), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to be, become); all the b- initial forms are from the same root. The vowel-initial forms as well as sy(dd) are from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be).

The present-progressive forms with yd- (ydwyf, etc.), and hence the colloquial present-affirmative forms with d- (dw, etc.), are from the affirmative particle yd.[1] Colloquial affirmative forms with r- (rwyt, roeddwn, etc.) are from the affirmative particle yr. Colloquial negative forms with d- (dydw, does, doeddwn, etc.) are from the negative particle nid.

The third-person singular present mae originally meant ‘here is’ and is from the same source as yma (here) plus Proto-Celtic *esti. The third-person plural maent (colloquial maen) is derived from the singular by adding the third-person plural verb ending -nt.

Counterfactual forms such as petaswn and taswn are from univerbation with pe (if) +‎ yd (affirmative particle).[2]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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bod (first-person singular present wyf)

  1. to be
  2. there be (there is, there are etc.)
  3. (auxiliary)
    1. Used with yn to form various tenses with progressive or stative meaning
    2. Used with wedi to form various tenses with perfect meaning
  4. that... is, that... are, etc. (personal forms: (fy) mod i, (dy) fod di, (ei) fod e/o, (ei) bod hi, (ein) bod ni, (eich) bod chi, (eu) bod nhw)
    Dw i’n meddwl (ei) bod hi’n ddoniol.I think that she’s funny.
    Mae hi’n meddwl (fy) mod i’n dod.She thinks that I’m coming.
    Roedd Eleri yn dweud (dy) fod di’n sâl.Eleri was saying you were ill.

Usage notes

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  • Bod is the primary auxiliary verb in Welsh, used to form a great number of periphrastic tenses; see Appendix:Welsh conjugation.
  • The two conditional tense stems bydd- and bas- can be opted between freely, although bas- is more common when used alongside a counterfactual in (pe) tas-.
  • The preterite is relatively rare and mostly interchangeable with the imperfect.
  • In the tenses given here, all forms of bod must be linked to a noun, adjective or verb with yn, wedi, or some other similar particle.
  • The existential sense ("there is") uses the distinct interrogative form oes and negative does, however the affirmative mae is the same as the main verb, as are all non-present tenses.
  • Bod introduces a subordinate clause only when the corresponding main clause would begin with a form of bod (the verb "to be") in the present or imperfect tense (including perfect and pluperfect clauses with wedi).
  • Nouns are preceded with bod, or fod if the preceding verb is conjugated.

Conjugation

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Derived terms

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  • bod am (to want)
  • bod gan, bod gyda (indicates possession)
  • darbod (take care of, verb)

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bod fod mod unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 219 ii 1
  2. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “petawn”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Further reading

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “bod”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies