Open main menu
See also: Roe, ROE, roé, róe, and

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /ˈɹəʊ/
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /ˈɹoʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: row (in some senses only)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English rowe, rowne, roun, rawne, from Old English *hrogn (spawn, fish eggs, roe), from Proto-Germanic *hrugnaz, *hrugną (spawn, roe), from Proto-Indo-European *krek- ((frog) spawn). Cognate with Dutch roge (roe), German Low German Rögen (roe), German Rogen (roe), Danish rogn, ravn (roe), Swedish rom (roe), Icelandic hrogn (roe), Lithuanian kurkulaĩ (frog spawn), Russian кряк (krjak, frog spawn).[1]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

roe (uncountable)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. The eggs of fish.
  2. The sperm of certain fish.
  3. The ovaries of certain crustaceans.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1988 : It was quite flavourless, except that, where its innards had been imperfectly removed, silver traces of roe gave it an unpleasant bitterness. — Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming Pool Library, (Penguin Books, paperback edition, 40)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ro, roa, from Old English , rāha, from Proto-Germanic *raihą (compare Saterland Frisian Räi, Dutch ree, German Reh), from *róyko-, from Proto-Indo-European *rey- (spotted, streaked) (compare Irish riabh ‘stripe, streak’, Latvian ràibs ‘spotted’, Russian рябо́й (rjabój, mottled fur).

NounEdit

roe (plural roe or roes)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. Short for roe deer.
  2. A mottled appearance of light and shade in wood, especially in mahogany.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1814 : . . . and we may, God willing, meet with a roe. The roe, Captain Waverley, may be hunted at all times alike; for never being in what is called pride of grease, he is also never out of season, though it be a truth that his venison is not equal to that of either the red or fallow deer. But he will serve to show how my dogs run . . . — Sir Walter Scott, Waverley, ch. 12.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wolfgang Pfeifer, ed., Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Deutschen, s.v. “Rogen” (Munich: Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, 2005).

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened form of roede, with regular loss of -de. From Proto-Germanic *rōdō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

roe f, m (plural roes, diminutive roetje n)

  1. Alternative form of roede
  2. bundle of twigs, especially in Sinterklaas folklore

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic [Term?]. Cognate to Finnish ruoja and Votic rooja (dirt, mud, dirtiness, dirty).

NounEdit

roe (genitive rooja, partitive rooja)

  1. faeces, excrement

DeclensionEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French roe < Latin rota.

NounEdit

roe f (plural roes)

  1. wheel (cylindrical device)

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun ro

VerbEdit

roe (imperative ro, present tense roer, passive roes, simple past and past participle roa or roet, present participle roende)

  1. (often reflexive, with seg) to calm (ned / down), to soothe

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun ro

VerbEdit

roe (present tense roar, past tense roa, past participle roa, passive infinitive roast, present participle roande, imperative ro/roe)

  1. (often reflexive, with seg) to calm (ned / down), to soothe

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin rota.

NounEdit

roe f (oblique plural roes, nominative singular roe, nominative plural roes)

  1. wheel (cylindrical device)

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

roe

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of roer.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of roer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of roer.