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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. Compare Welsh brysg and French brusque.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brisk (comparative brisker or more brisk, superlative briskest or most brisk)

  1. Full of liveliness and activity; characterized by quickness of motion or action
    Synonyms: lively, spirited, quick
    We took a brisk walk yesterday.
    • 2012 December 29, Paul Doyle, “Arsenal's Theo Walcott hits hat-trick in thrilling victory over Newcastle”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Ba, who has been linked with a January move to Arsenal, should have rewarded their brisk start with the opening goal in the 16th minute.
  2. Full of spirit of life; effervescing
  3. (archaic) sparkling; fizzy
    brisk cider
  4. Stimulating or invigorating.
    This morning was a brisk fall day. It wasn't cold enough for frost, but you wanted to keep moving.
  5. Abrupt, curt in one's manner or in relation to others.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

brisk (third-person singular simple present brisks, present participle brisking, simple past and past participle brisked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, often with "up") To make or become lively; to enliven; to animate.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From brej, possibly related to Proto-Indo-European *bhrisqo- 'bitter'. Compare Norwegian brisk (bitter taste), brisken (bitter, sharp), Welsh brysg, French brusque, Russian брезга́ть (brezgátʹ, nauseate, feel disgust), English brisk.

NounEdit

brisk

  1. razor
  2. sharp, smart, keen, freezing cold

LithuanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

brìsk

  1. second-person singular imperative of bristi