See also: Vital and vítal

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vital, from Old French vital, from Latin vītālis (of life, life-giving), from vīta (life), from vīvō (I live).Doublet of jiva and quick.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: vī'təl, IPA(key): /ˈvaɪtəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪtəl

AdjectiveEdit

vital (comparative more vital, superlative most vital)

  1. Relating to, or characteristic of life.
    Synonym: lifely
    vital energies; vital functions; vital actions
  2. Necessary to the continuation of life; being the seat of life; being that on which life depends.
    The brain is a vital organ.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book II, canto I, stanza 12:
      And doen the heavens afford him vitall food?
    • 1925, Seba Eldridge, The Organization of Life (page 164)
      We have argued that organizatory agents are operative in all vital processes, processes that overstep the limits of the physicochemical; []
    • 1913, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Poison Belt[1]:
      Challenger breathed two or three times with enormous gulps, his lungs roaring as he drew in the vital gas.
  3. Invigorating or life-giving.
  4. Necessary to continued existence.
    The transition to farming was vital for the creation of civilisation.
  5. Relating to the recording of life events.
    Birth, marriage and death certificates are vital records.
  6. Very important.
    Synonyms: crucial, necessary, significant; see also Thesaurus:important
    It is vital that you don't forget to do your homework.
    • 2012 December 14, Simon Jenkins, “We mustn't overreact to North Korea boys' toys”, in The Guardian Weekly[2], volume 188, number 2, page 23:
      David Cameron insists that his latest communications data bill is “vital to counter terrorism”. Yet terror is mayhem. It is no threat to freedom. That threat is from counter-terror, from ministers capitulating to securocrats.
    • 2018, Clarence Green; James Lambert, “Advancing disciplinary literacy through English for academic purposes: Discipline-specific wordlists, collocations and word families for eight secondary subjects”, in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, volume 35, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2018.07.004, page 105:
      Vocabulary is a vital component of educational success in both first and second language contexts.
    • 2022 January 12, Benedict le Vay, “The heroes of Soham...”, in RAIL, number 948, page 43:
      Typically for the 'get-on-with-it' era, the railway and military worked like demons to restore the vital rail link. The crater was rapidly filled in and the earth tamped solid, the wreckage was removed by breakdown trains, new rails and sleepers were rushed forward by willing hands, and US Army bulldozers piled in. By 2020 on the same day, both tracks were open for traffic again where there had been a gaping pit just hours before.
  7. Containing life; living.
    Synonyms: extant, live, kicking; see also Thesaurus:alive
  8. Capable of living; in a state to live; viable.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vitalis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vital (masculine and feminine plural vitals)

  1. vital

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French vital, from Latin vītālis (of life, life-giving).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vital (feminine vitale, masculine plural vitaux, feminine plural vitales)

  1. vital

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vītālis (of life, life-giving).

AdjectiveEdit

vital m or f (plural vitais)

  1. vital (relating to, or characteristic of life)
  2. vital, important, necessary

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vītālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vital (strong nominative masculine singular vitaler, comparative vitaler, superlative am vitalsten)

  1. lively; hale; vigorous
    Synonyms: lebhaft, markig, rüstig, voller Leben
  2. (rather rare, formal) vital (necessary to, or characteristic of life)
    Synonyms: lebenswichtig, Lebens-

DeclensionEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch vitaal, from Middle French vital, from Latin vītālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vital

  1. vital:
    1. very important.
    2. (medicine) necessary to the continuation of life; being the seat of life; being that on which life depends.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vital (not comparable)

  1. vital

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vitalis.

AdjectiveEdit

vital (neuter singular vitalt, definite singular and plural vitale)

  1. vital

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vitalis.

AdjectiveEdit

vital (neuter singular vitalt, definite singular and plural vitale)

  1. vital

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin vitalis.

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -al, (Brazil) -aw
  • Hyphenation: vi‧tal

AdjectiveEdit

vital m or f (plural vitais)

  1. vital (relating to, or characteristic of life)
  2. vital (necessary to the continuation of life)
  3. vital (very important)
    Synonyms: crucial, fundamental, essencial

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French vital, from Latin vitalis.

AdjectiveEdit

vital m or n (feminine singular vitală, masculine plural vitali, feminine and neuter plural vitale)

  1. vital

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vitalis.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

vital (plural vitales)

  1. vital

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit