See also: Canna

English

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Pronunciation

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  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkænə/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -ænə

Etymology 1

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From Latin canna (reed), from Ancient Greek κᾰ́ννᾱ (kánnā, reed), from Akkadian 𒂵𒉡𒌑𒌝 (qanûm). Cognates Biblical Hebrew קָנֶה (qané), Aramaic קַנְיָא (qanyā), Classical Syriac ܩܢܝܐ (qanya), and English canon, cannon, canal, and channel. Doublet of cane and kaneh.

Noun

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canna (plural cannas)

  1. Any member of the genus Canna of tropical plants with large leaves and often showy flowers.
    Synonym: canna lily
    • 2000, JG Ballard, Super-Cannes, Fourth Estate, published 2011, page 7:
      A palisade of Canary palms formed an honour guard along the verges, while beds of golden cannas flamed from the central reservation.
    • 2007 January 18, Anne Raver, “Is It Spring? Winter? What’s a Flower to Think?”, in New York Times[1]:
      Still, some of Mr. Cooper’s tender salvias are wintering over, and he plans to leave a few clumps of cannas in the ground next fall.
Translations
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Further reading

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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Scots cannae.

Contraction

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canna

  1. (Scotland, Cumbria, Jamaica) Contraction of can not: cannot.
    • 1966, “The Naked Time”, in Star Trek: The Original Series, season 1, episode 4, spoken by Scotty (James Doohan):
      I canna' change the laws of physics.
Translations
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Etymology 3

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Borrowed from Italian canna. Doublet of cane and kaneh.

Noun

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canna (plural cannas)

  1. (historical) A measure of length in Italy, varying from six to seven feet.

Etymology 4

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Clipping of cannabis.

Noun

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canna (uncountable)

  1. (slang, in combination) Clipping of cannabis.
Derived terms
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Anagrams

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French

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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canna

  1. third-person singular past historic of canner

Irish

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Etymology

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From Middle Irish cann, canna (can, vessel), borrowed from Old English canne.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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canna m (genitive singular canna, nominative plural cannaí)

  1. can

Declension

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Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
canna channa gcanna
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkan.na/
  • Rhymes: -anna
  • Hyphenation: càn‧na

Etymology 1

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From Latin canna, from Ancient Greek κᾰ́ννᾱ (kánnā, reed), from Akkadian 𒂵𒉡𒌑𒌝 (qanûm, reed).

Noun

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canna f (plural canne)

  1. cane
  2. barrel (of a gun)
    canna cilidricacylindrical barrel
  3. (fishing) rod
    canna da pescafishing rod
  4. tube, pipe (on a pump organ or a trachea)
    canne dell'organoorgan pipes
  5. chute
  6. (slang) joint
    Synonym: spinello
  7. (historical) traditional unit of measure
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • English: canna

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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canna

  1. inflection of cannare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Jamaican Creole

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From English cannot or Scots cannae.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkanə/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧nna

Verb

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canna

  1. (rare) Alternative form of cyaan.
    Nobody canna cross it.
    Nobody can cross it.
    (literally, “Nobody cannot cross it.”)
    • 2013, Axel Bohmann, “Nobody canna cross it: An interactional perspective on discourse in motion”, in The University of Texas at Austin, Department of English[2] (in English), page 4:
      “Cues on various levels of linguistic description suggested that he was attempting to speak ‘proper English’ for the camera while at the same time clearly lacking the linguistic competence to do so. The interview with Brown became famous when Jamaican DJ Kevin Hamilton (’DJ Powa’) remixed samples from it over an electronic beat and published the result on the video-sharing website Youtube.[sic] The music video went viral and sparked a wave of subsequent interviews, parodies and meta-linguistic commentary. The title of the song – “Nobody canna cross it” – has become emblematic of this entire phenomenon. []

Latin

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Ancient Greek κᾰ́ννᾱ (kánnā, reed), from Akkadian 𒂵𒉡𒌑𒌝 (qanûm, reed). Compare Biblical Hebrew קָנֶה (qané), Aramaic קַנְיָא (qanyā) or ܩܲܢܝܵܐ (qanyā) and Classical Syriac ܩܰܢܝܳܐ (qanyo).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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canna f (genitive cannae); first declension

  1. A reed, cane.
    Synonyms: calamus, harundō
  2. (by extension) Anything made of reed or cane; reed-pipe, flute; gondola; windpipe.
    Synonyms: harundō, tībia

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative canna cannae
Genitive cannae cannārum
Dative cannae cannīs
Accusative cannam cannās
Ablative cannā cannīs
Vocative canna cannae

Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  • canna”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • canna”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • canna in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • canna in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • canna in Georges, Karl Ernst, Georges, Heinrich (1913–1918) Ausführliches lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch, 8th edition, volume 1, Hahnsche Buchhandlung

Portuguese

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Noun

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canna f (plural cannas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of cana.

Scots

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Etymology

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can +‎ -na

Verb

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canna

  1. Orkney form of cannae (cannot)

Sicilian

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Etymology

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From Latin canna, from Ancient Greek κᾰ́ννᾱ (kánnā, reed), from Akkadian 𒂵𒉡𒌑𒌝 (qanûm, reed).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkan.na/, [ˈkäːn̺.n̺ɑ̝]
  • Hyphenation: càn‧na

Noun

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canna f (plural canni)

 
Sicilian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia scn
  1. reed, stick, rattan; a cane, rod, instrument, or other item made out of such material
  2. barrel (as of a gun or cannon)
  3. tube, pipe (as on a pump organ or a trachea)
    canna d'organuorgan pipe

Derived terms

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Yola

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Etymology

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*can +‎ na

Pronunciation

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Contraction

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canna

  1. can not
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 7-9[1]:
      and whilke we canna zei, albeit o' 'Governere,' 'Statesman,' an alike.
      and for which we have no words but of 'Governor,' 'Statesman,' &c.
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 131, lines 5[2]:
      Wu canna baar to gow aveel,
      We cannot bear to go abroad,
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 131, lines 9[2]:
      Wu canna gow to Ilone vaar,
      We cannot go to the Island fair,
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 131, lines 13[2]:
      Wu canna gow bee chapaal gaat,
      We cannot go to the chapel gate

References

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  1. ^ Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland