See also: creme, Creme, crémé, cremé, and Crème

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French crème. Doublet of cream and crema.

AdjectiveEdit

crème (comparative more crème, superlative most crème)

  1. Synonym of cream
    • 1989, Benjamin Evans Dean, A Virginian in Yankeeland: Volume Four: Some Stars and Stripes Voyages, →ISBN, page 10:
      I was still wearing Florsheim cordovan wingtip shoes, medium gray flannel slacks, with a broadcoth crème shirt that displayed pale green stripes setting off my dark green silk tie imprinted with light brown heads of horses.
    • 1999, Margaret Allison (pseudonym; Cheryl Klam), The Last Curve, Pocket Books, →ISBN, page 15:
      He went through periods where he wore monochromatic outfits, and though he had begun to experiment with new combinations, he still liked to return to the blue suit with the blue shirt and the blue tie, or the creme colored suit with the creme shirt and the creme tie.
    • 2005, Cincinnati Wedding, pages 48 (picture perfect) and 51 (master class):
      (this page) Crème sequin dress by St. Patrick, $1,000, at Bridal Designs, Dragonfly earrings, $12,000, cultured pearl necklace worn as bracelet, $14,000, Lucida® solitaire diamond ring, $22,800, channel set diamond band, $2,075, at Tiffany & Co. Shoes by Stuart Weitzman, $285. [] (left) Crème dress with white lace overlay and pink sash by Monique Lhuillier, $2,910, at Bridal & Formal.

NounEdit

crème (countable and uncountable, plural crèmes)

  1. (cooking) A very sugary, fluffy white cream derivative.
  2. (cosmetics) Cream

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

crème (third-person singular simple present crèmes, present participle crèming, simple past and past participle crèmed)

  1. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 1929 July 11, “Look Lovely Tonight: New Skin Beauty in Five Minutes—It’s as Simple as Washing Your Face”, in Daily News, volume 11, number 13, New York, N.Y., page 33, column 2:
      Cremed magnesia beautifies the skin in the same easy way that milk of magnesia purifies the stomach [] Thousands of doctors now insist that their wives, patients and nurses use nothing but cremed magnesia on their faces.
    • 1966, Mademoiselle: The Magazine for the Smart Young Woman, volume 64:
      Raspberries, usually souffléed or crèmed []
    • 1976 April 7, Battle Creek Enquirer and News, volume 76, number 260, Battle Creek, Mich., page A-8:
      CREMING BLEACH 1.5 oz. net wt. / & CREME ACTIVATOR 1 oz. wt.
    • 1989, Honey Hotline:
      Cremed Honey Spreads Combine the Goodness of Nature [] David Yurgelum of Gourmet Products (Watertown, Conn.) is a connoisseur when it comes to cremed honey spreads.
    • 2001, Paula Begoun, Don’t Go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me: A Unique Guide to Over 30,000 Products, Plus the Latest Skin-Care Research, 5th edition, →ISBN, page 929:
      Cremed Powder Eyeshadow ($16) has a slightly heavy texture that is more powdery than creamy.
    • 2012, Kirstin Jackson, “Délice de la Vallée Fromage Blanc, California”, in It’s Not You, It’s Brie: Unwrapping America’s Unique Culture of Cheese, Perigee Books, →ISBN:
      Translating to “delight of the valley,” Délice is an uber-crèmed fromage blanc, or as Davis likes to call it, a “crème de fromage.” It’s a triple crème, fresh, soft cheese made with whole cow’s milk and cream, with fresh Sonoma chèvre mixed in.
    • 2015, Erin Barrett, and Jack Mingo, editors, W. C. Privy’s Original Bathroom Companion, number 2, St. Martin’s Press, →ISBN:
      Sweet! / How Twinkies Got Crèmed / They’re golden brown, irresistibly spongy, and filled with “crème” (you don’t think there’s actually cream in there, do you?).

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French crème.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /krɛm/, /krɛːm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: crè‧me

NounEdit

crème f (plural crèmes, diminutive crèmepje n or crèmeke n)

  1. cream (light color)
  2. (Belgium, colloquial) ice cream
    • 1962, Hugo Claus, De verwondering.
      ‘Een crèmeke, alstublief, m'dam.’
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2011, Guido van Heulendonk, Terug naar Killary Harbour.
      HIER CRÈME MET ÉCHTE FRAISEN!
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2017 October 15, 'Goesting' (pseud.), "Crème de la crème: hier lik je de lekkerste ijsjes van het land", Het Laatste Nieuws.
      Goesting ging testen en serveert de crème de la crème onder de crème, al zeggen we er meteen bij dat deze lijst uiteraard niet volledig is.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  3. cream (ointment)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: krem
  • Papiamentu: krèm

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French chresme, from Old French cresme, from Late Latin crama, Transalpine Gaulish word influenced by Latin chrisma (modern French chrême), from Ancient Greek χρῖσμα (khrîsma).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

crème (invariable)

  1. (color) cream
  2. (colloquial) cool
    Synonyms: cool, bien, classe

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

crème f (plural crèmes)

  1. cream
  2. (France, colloquial) café crème
  3. (Louisiana) ice cream

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

crème

  1. first-person singular present indicative of crémer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of crémer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of crémer
  4. second-person singular imperative of crémer

See alsoEdit

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir
             rouge; cramoisi              orange; brun              jaune; crème
             vert citron              vert              menthe
             cyan; bleu canard              azur              bleu
             violet; indigo              magenta; pourpre              rose

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

crème

  1. inflection of crèmen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French chresme, from Old French cresme, from Late Latin crāmum, a blend of Gaulish *crama and Late Latin chrisma (ointment).

NounEdit

crème f (plural crèmes)

  1. (Jersey) cream

Related termsEdit