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See also: Orange and orangé

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Various shades of orange.
 
Some oranges (the fruits).
 
An orange tree.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English orenge, orange, from Old French pome orenge (Persian orange), literally “orange apple”, influenced by Old Provençal auranja and calqued from Old Italian melarancio, melarancia, compound of mela (apple) and (n)arancia (orange), from Arabic نَارَنْج (nāranj), from Persian نارنگ (nārang), from Sanskrit नारङ्ग (nāraṅga, orange tree), from Dravidian (compare Tamil நார்த்தங்காய் (nārttaṅkāy), compound of நரந்தம் (narantam, fragrance) and காய் (kāy, fruit); also Telugu నారంగము (nāraṃgamu), Malayalam നാരങ്ങ (nāraṅṅa), Kannada ನಾರಂಗಿ (nāraṃgi)).

For other similar cases of the incorrect division of Italian but in English, see also apron (n disappearing), daffodil (with d), newt (n appearing), nickname (n appearing) and umpire (n disappearing).

For the color sense, replaced Old English geoluread (yellow-red); compare English blue-green.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orange (countable and uncountable, plural oranges)

  1. An evergreen tree of the genus Citrus such as Citrus sinensis.
  2. The fruit of an orange tree; a citrus fruit with a slightly sour flavour.
  3. The colour of a ripe fruit of an orange tree, midway between red and yellow.
    orange colour:  
  4. Orange juice.
  5. Orange coloured and flavoured cordial.
  6. Orange coloured and flavoured soft drink.

Usage notesEdit

  • It is commonly believed that “orange” has no rhymes. While there are no commonly used English dictionary words that rhyme exactly with “orange” (“door-hinge” comes close in US pronunciation), the English surname Gorringe is a rhyme, at least in UK pronunciation. See the Wikipedia article about rhymes for the word “orange”

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

orange (comparative oranger or more orange, superlative orangest or most orange)

  1. Having the colour of the fruit of an orange tree; yellowred; reddish-yellow.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

orange (third-person singular simple present oranges, present participle oranging, simple past and past participle oranged)

  1. (transitive) To color orange.
    • 1986, Gilles Deleuze, Cinema: The movement-image, page 118:
      It is this composition which reaches a colourist perfection in Le Bonheur with the complementarity of violet, purple and oranged gold
    • 1987, Harold Keith, Rifles for Watie, page 256:
      Jeff winked his eyes sleepily open and looked out into the cool flush of early morning. The east was oranged over with daybreak.
    • 2009, Suzanne Crowley, The Very Ordered Existence of Merilee Marvelous, page 117:
      I looked at him through my binoculars, his little lips oranged with Cheeto dust.
  2. (intransitive) To become orange.
    • 2007, Terézia Mora, Day in day out, page 296:
      Cranes in the distance against the background of the slowly oranging sky
    • 2008, Wanda Coleman, (Please provide the book title or journal name), page 14:
      It will be followed by a disappearance of the cash I had hidden in a sealed envelope behind the oranging Modigliani print over the living room couch.
    • 2010, Justin Cronin, The Passage, page 330:
      "What about his eyes?" / "Nothing. No oranging at all, from what I could see.

See alsoEdit

Colors in English · colors, colours (layout · text)
     white      gray, grey      black      brown
             pink              red, crimson              orange              yellow, cream
             lime              green              {{{mint green}}}, {{{dark green}}}              cyan, teal
             azure, sky blue              blue              violet, indigo              magenta, purple

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Short form of late Old French pume orenge or pomme d'orenge, which was calqued after Old Italian melarancia (mela + arancia). The o came into the word under influence of the place name Orange, from where these fruits came to the north. See orange (English).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orange f (plural oranges)

  1. orange (fruit)
    Il pressa l’orange afin d’en extraire du jus.
    He squeezed the orange to extract juice from it.

NounEdit

orange m (plural oranges)

  1. orange (color)

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

orange (invariable)

  1. orange
    Les premiers TGV atlantiques étaient orange.
    The first Atlantic TGV trains were orange.

Usage notesEdit

While theoretically the adjective orange is invariable, being (originally) a colour name derived from a noun, the nonstandard plural oranges is in use.

AnagramsEdit

See alsoEdit

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir      brun
             rose              rouge, cramoisi              orange              jaune, crème
             vert citron              vert              {{{mint green}}}, {{{dark green}}}              cyan, bleu canard
             azur              bleu              violet, indigo              magenta, pourpre

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun Orange (orange fruit), from French orange.

PronunciationEdit

  • (predicative only) IPA(key): /oˈrãːʃ/, /oˈraŋʃ/, /oˈrɔ̃ːʃ/, /oˈrɔŋʃ/
  • (non-predicative feminine and plural forms) IPA(key): /oˈrãːʒə/, /oˈraŋʒə/, /oˈrɔ̃ːʒə/, /oˈrɔŋʒə/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

orange (comparative oranger or orangener, superlative am orangesten or am orangensten)

  1. orange

Usage notesEdit

  • The adjective has two sets of forms. In the formal standard language, endings are added directly to the stem (orang-). In less formal style and in the vernacular, a third set of forms is used in free variation, in which an -n- is infixed before the endings.
  • It is also officially correct to leave the adjective entirely undeclined. This usage is rare, however, and seems dated.

DeclensionEdit

Standard forms
Colloquial forms

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French orange.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

orange (masculine orangen, neuter oranget, comparative méi orange, superlative am orangesten)

  1. orange

DeclensionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

See alsoEdit

Colors in Luxembourgish · Faarwen (layout · text)
     wäiss      gro      schwaarz      brong
             rosa              rout, ?              orange              giel, ?
             ?              gréng              ?, ?              ?, ?
             himmelblo              blo              violett, indigo              magenta, mof

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

orange m, f

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) orange

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French orange. See English orange.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

orange (comparative orangeare, superlative orangeast)

  1. orange

DeclensionEdit

  A user suggests that this Swedish entry be cleaned up giving the reason: "use template?".
Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.
Inflections of orange
Comparation by mer and mest
Indefinite
singular
Common orange
Neuter orange
Definite
singular
Masc. orange
All orange, orangea
Plural orange, orangea

NounEdit

orange ?

  1. orange (color)