See also: Orange and orangé

English edit

 
Various shades of orange.
 
Some oranges (the fruits).
 
An orange tree.

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle English orenge, orange, from Old French pome orenge (fruit orange), influenced by the place name Orange (which is from Gaulish and unrelated to the word for the fruit and color) and by Old Occitan auranja and calqued from Old Italian melarancio, melarancia, compound of mela (apple) and un'arancia (an orange), from Arabicنَارَنْج(nāranj), from Early Classical Persianنَارَنْگْ(nārang), from Sanskrit नारङ्ग (nāraṅga, orange tree),[1] ultimately from Dravidian. Compare Tamil நாரங்காய் (nāraṅkāy), compound of நாரம் (nāram, water) and காய் (kāy, fruit); also Telugu నారంగము (nāraṅgamu), Malayalam നാരങ്ങ (nāraṅṅa), Kannada ನಾರಂಗಿ (nāraṅgi)).

Originally borrowed as the surname (derived from the place name) in the 13th century, before the sense of the fruit was imported in the late 14th century and the color in 1510.[1] In the color sense, largely displaced ġeolurēad, whence yellow-red.

For other cases of incorrect division (or, elision/rebracketing) like the Italian word above, see Category:English rebracketings.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

orange (countable and uncountable, plural oranges)

  1. (countable) An evergreen tree of the genus Citrus such as Citrus sinensis which yields oranges (the fruit).
  2. (countable) Any round citrus fruit with a yellow-red colour when ripe and a sour-sweet taste; the fruit of the orange tree.
    1. (countable) Specifically, a sweet orange or Citrus sinensis.
  3. (uncountable) The colour of a ripe fruit of an orange tree, midway between red and yellow.
    orange:  
    Synonym: yellow-red
  4. (uncommon) Various drinks:
    • 2015 March 31, Debbie McGowan, Two By Two, Beaten Track Publishing, →ISBN, page 81:
      “What you drinking?” “Orange and soda will go down nicely, thanks.” “Pint?” “Sure.” Andy headed for the bar, stopping along the way to kiss Shaunna and check she and Kris were OK for a drink. “Everything all right?” Sean asked.
    • 2015 May 7, Tosh Lavery, Tosh: An Amazing True Story Of Life, Death, Danger And Drama In The Garda Sub-Aqua Unit, Penguin UK, →ISBN:
      I ran out into the street and around the block, searching everywhere, and finally burst into O'Dowd's pub around the corner to see Thomas sitting at the bar drinking orange and eating a bag of crisps with two old men.
    • 2018 May 25, Michael Nilsen, Beyond the Cave, Troubador Publishing Ltd, →ISBN, page 82:
      It transpired this lad was drinking orange and faculties were keen. There were one or two verbal exchanges, then I followed him into the car park. He said to the doorman, 'I won't be long.' He easily knocked me to the ground.
    • 2021 June 10, Anna McPartlin, Waiting for the Miracle: Warm your heart this winter with this uplifting novel from the bestselling author of THE LAST DAYS OF RABBIT HAYES, Bonnier Zaffre Ltd., →ISBN:
      When the fast songs played, like the Beatles' 'Help' or The Rolling Stones' 'Satisfaction', Justin and I sat on two wooden chairs, drinking orange and holding hands. When the nuns weren't watching, I rested my head on his shoulder.
    1. (uncountable) Orange juice.
    2. (uncountable) An orange-coloured and orange-flavoured cordial.
    3. (uncountable) An orange-coloured and orange-flavoured soft drink.
  5. (heraldry) An orange-coloured roundel.

Usage notes edit

  • It is commonly stated that orange has no rhymes. While there are no commonly used English dictionary words that rhyme exactly with orange (door hinge comes close in US pronunciation), see Rhymes:English/ɒɹɪndʒ for some possibilities. See also the Wikipedia article about rhymes for the word orange
  • In most dialects, orange is pronounced with two syllables. But in certain dialects of North American English, the vowel of the second syllable is deleted and the word is pronounced as one syllable.[2] In such dialects, the two forms are generally allophonic.

Hypernyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Esperanto: oranĝo
  • Japanese: オレンジ (orenji)
  • Korean: 오렌지 (orenji)
  • Malay: oren
  • Marshallese: oran

Translations edit

Adjective edit

orange (comparative oranger or more orange, superlative orangest or most orange)

  1. Having the colour of the fruit of an orange tree; yellowred; reddish-yellow.
    Antonym: nonorange

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

orange (third-person singular simple present oranges, present participle oranging, simple past and past participle oranged)

  1. (transitive) To color orange.
    • 1986, Gilles Deleuze, Cinema: The movement-image, page 118:
      It is this composition which reaches a colourist perfection in Le Bonheur with the complementarity of violet, purple and oranged gold
    • 1987, Harold Keith, Rifles for Watie, page 256:
      Jeff winked his eyes sleepily open and looked out into the cool flush of early morning. The east was oranged over with daybreak.
    • 2009, Suzanne Crowley, The Very Ordered Existence of Merilee Marvelous, page 117:
      I looked at him through my binoculars, his little lips oranged with Cheeto dust.
  2. (intransitive) To become orange.
    • 2007, Terézia Mora, Day in day out, page 296:
      Cranes in the distance against the background of the slowly oranging sky
    • 2008, Wanda Coleman, Jazz & twelve o'clock tales: new stories, page 14:
      It will be followed by a disappearance of the cash I had hidden in a sealed envelope behind the oranging Modigliani print over the living room couch.
    • 2010, Justin Cronin, The Passage, page 330:
      "What about his eyes?" / "Nothing. No oranging at all, from what I could see.

See also edit

Colors in English · colors, colours (layout · text)
     white      gray, grey, silver      black
             red; crimson              orange; brown              yellow; cream
             lime green              green              mint green; dark green
             cyan; teal              azure, sky blue              blue
             violet; indigo              magenta; purple              pink

References edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Short form of late Old French pume orenge or pomme d'orenge, which was calqued after Old Italian melarancia (mela + arancia). The o came into the word under influence of the place name Orange, from where these fruits came to the north. See orange (English).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

orange f (plural oranges)

  1. orange (fruit)
    Il pressa l’orange afin d’en extraire du jus.
    He squeezed the orange to extract juice from it.

Descendants edit

Noun edit

orange m (plural oranges)

  1. orange (color)

Derived terms edit

Adjective edit

orange (invariable)

  1. orange
    Les premiers TGV atlantiques étaient orange.
    The first Atlantic TGV trains were orange.

Usage notes edit

While theoretically the adjective orange is invariable, being (originally) a colour name derived from a noun, the nonstandard plural oranges is in use.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Colors in French · couleurs (layout · text)
     blanc      gris      noir
             rouge; cramoisi, carmin              orange; brun, marron              jaune; crème
             lime              vert              menthe
             cyan, turquoise; bleu canard              azur, bleu ciel              bleu
             violet, lilas; indigo              magenta; pourpre              rose

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

German edit

Etymology edit

From the noun Orange (orange fruit), from French orange.

Pronunciation edit

  • (predicative only) IPA(key): /oˈʁãːʃ/, /oˈʁaŋʃ/, /oˈʁɔ̃ːʃ/, /oˈʁɔŋʃ/
  • (non-predicative feminine and plural forms) IPA(key): /oˈʁãːʒə/, /oˈʁaŋʒə/, /oˈʁɔ̃ːʒə/, /oˈʁɔŋʒə/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

  A user suggests that this German entry be cleaned up, giving the reason: “"strong nominative masculine singular (standard) oranger or (colloquial) orangener" -- this lacks the form "orange".”
Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) or the talk page for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.

orange (strong nominative masculine singular (standard) oranger or (colloquial) orangener, comparative (standard) oranger or (colloquial) orangener, superlative (standard) am orangesten or (colloquial) am orangensten)

  1. orange

Usage notes edit

  • The adjective has two sets of forms. In the formal standard language, endings are added directly to the stem (orang-). In less formal style and in the vernacular, another set of forms is used in free variation, in which an -n- is infixed before the endings.
  • It is also officially correct to leave the adjective entirely undeclined. This usage is rare, however, and seems dated.

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • orange” in Duden online
  • orange” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Limburgish edit

Noun edit

orange f

  1. Veldeke spelling spelling of Orasch

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French orange.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

orange (masculine orangen, neuter oranget, comparative méi orange, superlative am orangesten)

  1. orange

See also edit

Colors in Luxembourgish · Faarwen (layout · text)
     wäiss      gro      schwaarz
             rout              orange; brong              giel
                          gréng             
             turquoise              blo (hellblo, himmelblo)              blo (donkelblo)
             violett; indigo              magenta; mof              rosa; pink

Middle English edit

Noun edit

orange

  1. Alternative form of orenge

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Adjective edit

orange m or f

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) orange

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French orange. See English orange.

Pronunciation edit

  • (indefinite common singular) IPA(key): /ʊˈranɕ/, (southern) /ʊˈraŋɧ/
  • (indefinite neuter singular) IPA(key): /ʊˈranɕt/, (southern) /ʊˈraŋɧt/
  • (definite masculine singular) IPA(key): /ʊˈranɕɛ/, (southern) /ʊˈraŋɧɛ/
  • (definite or plural) IPA(key): /ʊˈranɕa/, (southern) /ʊˈraŋɧa/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

orange

  1. orange
    Hon har långt, orange hår.
    She has long, orange hair.

Declension edit

Inflection of orange
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular orange orangeare orangeaste
Neuter singular orange orangeare orangeaste
Plural orange orangeare orangeaste
Masculine plural3 orange orangeare orangeaste
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 orange orangeare orangeaste
All orange orangeare orangeaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic
Less common:
Inflection of orange
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular orange orangeare orangeaste
Neuter singular oranget orangeare orangeaste
Plural orangea orangeare orangeaste
Masculine plural3 orangea orangeare orangeaste
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 orange orangeare orangeaste
All orangea orangeare orangeaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic
Inflection of orange
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular orange orangare orangast
Neuter singular orangt orangare orangast
Plural oranga orangare orangast
Masculine plural3 orange orangare orangast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 orange orangare orangaste
All oranga orangare orangaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Noun edit

orange ?

  1. orange (color)