See also: Curry

EnglishEdit

 
Fish head curry, a popular dish in Singapore
 
The title page of a 1780 reprint of the 1390 work Forme of Cury

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: kŭrʹē, IPA(key): /ˈkʌɹ.i/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkʌɹ.i/, /ˈkɝ.i/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɹi

Etymology 1Edit

1747 (as currey, first published recipe for the dish in English[1][2]), from Tamil கறி (kaṟi), influenced by existing Middle English cury (cooking),[2] from Middle French cuyre (to cook) (from which also cuisine), from Vulgar Latin cocere, from Latin coquere, present active infinitive of coquō.

Earlier cury found in 1390 cookbook Forme of Cury (Forms of Cooking) by court chefs of Richard II of England.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

curry (countable and uncountable, plural curries)

  1. One of a family of dishes originating from Indian cuisine, flavoured by a spiced sauce.
    Synonym: (rhyming slang) Ruby Murray
  2. A spiced sauce or relish, especially one flavoured with curry powder.
  3. Curry powder.
    Synonym: curry powder
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Chinese: 咖哩
  • Danish: karri
  • Irish: curaí
  • Japanese: カレー
  • Korean: 커리 (keori)
  • Swedish: kurry
  • Turkish: köri
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

curry (third-person singular simple present curries, present participle currying, simple past and past participle curried)

  1. (transitive) To cook or season with curry powder.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English currayen, from Old French correer (to prepare), presumably from Vulgar Latin *conredare, from Latin com- (a form of con- (with; together)) + a verb derived from Proto-Germanic *raidaz. More at ready.

VerbEdit

curry (third-person singular simple present curries, present participle currying, simple past and past participle curried)

  1. (transitive) To groom (a horse); to dress or rub down a horse with a curry comb.
  2. (transitive) To dress (leather) after it is tanned by beating, rubbing, scraping and colouring.
  3. (transitive) To beat, thrash; to drub.
  4. (transitive) To try to win or gain (favour) by flattering.
Usage notesEdit

The sense "To win or gain favour" is most frequently used in the phrases "to curry favour (with)" and "to curry [someone's] favour".

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

Named after American mathematician Haskell Curry.

VerbEdit

curry (third-person singular simple present curries, present participle currying, simple past and past participle curried)

  1. (transitive, computing) To perform currying upon.
    • 2011, Zachary Kessin, Programming HTML5 Applications: Building Powerful Cross-Platform Environments in JavaScript, "O'Reilly Media, Inc." (→ISBN), page 21:
      The easiest way to curry parameters is to create a function that takes a parameter block and returns a function that will call the original function with the presupplied parameters as defaults [] .
    • 2015, Leonardo Borges, Clojure Reactive Programming, Packt Publishing Ltd (→ISBN), page 194:
      Next, we curry the avg function to 3 arguments and put it into an option.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Possibly derived from currier, a common 16th- to 18th-century form of courier, as if to ride post, to post. Possibly influenced by scurry.

VerbEdit

curry (third-person singular simple present curries, present participle currying, simple past and past participle curried)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To scurry; to ride or run hastily
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To cover (a distance); (of a projectile) to traverse (its range).
    • 1608, George Chapman, The Conspiracie, and Tragedie of Charles Duke of Byron 2.245
      I am not hee that can ... by midnight leape my horse, curry seauen miles.
    • 1662, Thomas Salusbury, Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (Dialogue Two)
      All these shots shall curry or finish their ranges in times equal to each other.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To hurry.
    • 1676, Andrew Marvell, Mr. Smirke 34
      A sermon is soon curryed over.

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

curry (plural curries)

  1. Obsolete form of quarry.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hannah Glasse, Glasse’s Art of Cookery, 1747
  2. 2.0 2.1 “The Origins of ‘Curry’ (Is it really English?)”, in (please provide the title of the work)[1], accessed 8 October 2010, archived from the original on 29 September 2011

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English curry.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

curry m (plural curry's, diminutive curry'tje n)

  1. the spicy condiment curry powder
    Synonyms: kerrie, kerriepoeder
  2. a curry dish
    Synonym: kerrieschotel
  3. curry ketchup
    Synonym: curryketchup

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English curry, itself from Tamil கறி (kaṟi).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑrːi/, [ˈkɑrːi]
  • Rhymes: -ɑrːi
  • Syllabification: kar‧ri

NounEdit

curry

  1. curry, curry powder (south Asian spice mix)
  2. curry (a dish made using this spice mixture)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of curry (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative curry curryt
genitive curryn curryjen
partitive currya curryja
illative curryyn curryihin
singular plural
nominative curry curryt
accusative nom. curry curryt
gen. curryn
genitive curryn curryjen
partitive currya curryja
inessive curryssa curryissa
elative currysta curryista
illative curryyn curryihin
adessive currylla curryilla
ablative currylta curryilta
allative currylle curryille
essive curryna curryina
translative curryksi curryiksi
instructive curryin
abessive currytta curryitta
comitative curryineen
Possessive forms of curry (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person curryni currymme
2nd person currysi currynne
3rd person currynsa

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed into Middle French from multiple sources including English curry, all ultimately derived from Tamil கறி (kaṟi).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

curry m (plural currys)

  1. curry

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

curry m (invariable)

  1. curry; curry powder

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From English curry, from Tamil கறி (kaṟi).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

curry n (indeclinable)

  1. curry (dish)
  2. curry powder

Further readingEdit

  • curry in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • curry in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

curry m (uncountable)

  1. curry powder (mixture of spices used in Asian cooking)
  2. curry (dish made with curry powder)

RomanianEdit

 
curry

NounEdit

curry m (uncountable)

  1. curry powder (mixture of spices)
  2. curry (dish)

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

curry m (plural currys)

  1. curry

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

curry c (uncountable)

  1. a curry
  2. curry powder

DeclensionEdit

Declension of curry 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative curry curryn
Genitive currys curryns